We Visit A Koi Garden And See Mike And Arline's Pyramid

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Yesterday we visited the Earl B. Miller Japanese Garden on the campus of California State University, Long Beach.  The garden is only 1.3 acres (5261 square meters), consisting of a large koi-filled pond surrounded by a gently curving path through traditional Japanese style plantings.   There is a small gravel-garden in the austere Zen style and a small side path leading to a Tea House structure.
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The entrance way frames three Cycas revoluta, common name Sago Palm.  These plants are native to southern Japan, and so are correct for a Japanese-style garden.  
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There are the expected stone lanterns...
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...bridges...
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...and viewing platforms...
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...and waterfalls.
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Plants include Pines, Japanese Maples, Camellias, and Podocarpus, all trimmed in the niwaki style.
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The garden had a serene feel, although it is right under the flight path of Long Beach airport, and is adjacent to a large collection of student housing.  It must be a soothing place for students to visit.  
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Bridge detail:
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The big attraction during our visit were the koi, which you can feed.  There's a small machine that vends a handful of koi pellets for 25 cents.  The koi happened to be ravenous, and people of all ages were laughing and smiling as they fed the happy fish.  The koi looked very well cared for and healthy.  It was so nice to see that in a public garden.  The fish zipped from person to person--whoever was tossing pellets--and they looked like cars on a highway driving pedal-to-the-metal as they streaked from place to place.  First one there gets the food...
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Circle around...
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...line up like hogs at the trough...
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The koi were very tame and quite willing to eat from anyone's hand.  The squeals from people when koi jumped into their palms filled the air, creating a happy atmosphere. 
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There were some water plants heavily trimmed by the hungry koi, so they looked ragged and sparse.
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Ducks were visiting, too. 
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The koi were hungry!
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There were a dozen or so larger fish and a hundred or more fry.
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The water and koi sparkling in the bright sunlight  combined with the happy laughter of children and adults alike brought joy to the spirit. 
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The reflections of trees in the water creating painting-like effects.  
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Even visiting ducks seemed to be at peace with the world.  Luckily for the ducks, Koi are gentle vegetarians.  
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It was a lovely place, but the unexpected mood of relaxed happiness that radiated from visitors was sweet and memorable.  The koi and the peaceful surroundings were healing people left and right.  This is the greatest work a garden can do. 

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On our way home,  we stopped to see the Walter Pyramid.  At first I thought it was mirrored  glass, but it turned out to be corregated metal painted blue.  
With a Eucalyptus:
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There is the great Pyramid of Pharaoh Khufu in Egypt, but in Long Beach, the Pyramid belongs to  Mike and Arline.
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 Nice touch of a pyramid-shaped cover for the recycle bin:
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 Very California!  
The goofy blue building and all the happy people in the Koi garden made us happy and relaxed, refreshed in spirit.
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And a video of the koi:

Comments

  1. Love the Japanese garden, beautiful photographs. This post has made me think that my new garden may have to be half succulents half japanese

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    1. So many possibilities for your new garden! :) Whatever you choose, I know it will be beautifully done.

      The place was so lovely I thought for a moment about ripping everything out in my garden and going Japanese-style, but with a Mediterranean house, it just won't work. Maybe that is good.

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  2. Wow, great visit to the koi garden. What a beautiful and serene garden and how lovely to see such well cared for koi... lovely

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  3. Looks like a nice place to spend an afternoon, but it must be really special in early morning. Aren't koi always hungry? :-)

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    1. That's true, Alan, they are always hungry!

      Must be special in the morning, yes. Too bad not open to the public until noon. :(

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  4. Japanese gardens ARE very good for the soul. We have a lovely one here in Portland. Although I visit our classical Chinese garden much more frequently, you've reminded me that this is a great time of year to visit our beautiful (and extensive) Japanese garden. Arigatou gozaimasu!

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    1. Would make a great blog post, MulchMaid. (Hint, hint!)

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  5. ooooooo!! this post actually got my heart beating faster....I love a Japanese garden....great shots

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  6. I love it when you enter a space, with strangers, and everyone has a similar reaction where moods are elevated and spirits delighted. It is not a common thing.

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    1. No not at all common. The koi were working magic on everyone, and it was lovely.

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