A Neighborhood Agave Titanota Begins To Bloom

Neighbor's house:  love that!
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Love the simplicity of it, love the three different kinds of yellow-green (two different cacti, Alluadia) mixed with two kinds of white-silver-blue (Agaves and rocks), love the texture of the roof contrasting with the smoothness of the wall.   Ooooohhh!!!  Loooovvvvve!!!  When shall I have such plant selection discipline?  Most probably never. 

I've blogged before about the Agaves at this property back in the summer of 2011One of their Agave titanotas is now in bloom and wrapped in holiday lights.  
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Unlike A. americana or A. desmetiana, the titanota flower stem does not branch.  The flowers are all on the main stem rather than on side branches.   What is the evolutionary purpose of those long whiskers? 
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Quite tall...the holiday light wrap starts about 9 feet (3 M) up...
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The light string wanders over to a nearby Euphorbia:
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Offsets of the blooming titanota are also blooming:
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The home has plenty of younger titanotas as well.  The younger plants look different than the mature version, which holds its straight flattened leaves stiffly and isolated like propeller blades.  The youngsters are incurved and cabbage-y.  Titanota is a highly variable species not only from youth to maturity, but also in essence.  Leaf color can vary greatly from green to alabaster white and blue-white.  Spines and teeth may be papery brown, burgundy, black.
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Some other nice succulents at this home include a big clump of a spineless, lax opuntia in Christmas-appropriate red and green:
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Agave...parryi, is it?  The non-truncata version?
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A wonderful flawless sprawl of Opuntia microdaysis behind an Aloe of an unknown species:
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A happy Sotol (Dasylirion wheelerii) with golden barrels (Echinocactus grusonii):
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And...very cool, although I've never seen an Agave with a caudex before.  Agave 'Rusty Steel'?
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I will be making regular trips past that blooming Agave this winter and spring to see how it progresses. 

Comments

  1. Keep us updated and I agree how lovely that planting area is. Interesting to see that that offsets are blooming simultaneously with the mother plant.

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    1. The offsets blooming is apparently quite typical. Even a few of the bulbils on my blooming desmettianas bloomed!

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  2. I love that planting along the wall, and the Opuntia microdaysis is wonderful!

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  3. Such restraint; such beauty. Do you suppose that Agave 'Rusty Steel' will ever bloom?

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    1. If it does bloom, perhaps an entirely new source for metal?

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  4. Oh!!! You're killing me...too beautiful!!!

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    1. A joy to drive by there, lifts my spirits every time.

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  5. Now that's some foliage and form...and color without flowers. Maybe you might find one area to practice such discipline, leaving the 90% balance as Hoover Botanical Garden?

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    1. That's a great idea, I'm going to try it. :)

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  6. Lovely plantings! Isn't it wonderful to have neighbors with good gardens, as well as your own lush and varied plantings?

    Your plantings may not have such clean lines and simplicity, but they also are attractive as sculpture and paintings. There are more styles of art than mimimalist!!! I love your garden!

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    1. Thanks for your kind thoughts. That is true, more than one style of beauty in the world.

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  7. Ooohhhh. My tiny A. titanota can only dream of such splendor!

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  8. I actually blurted out "miraculous!" seeing these photos. So beautiful.

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    1. Maybe I don't have to feel silly driving by to gawk at the place?

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  9. That first picture is something of my dreams! Throw in a bismarkia nobilis or brahea armata and I would be in heaven!

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    1. Yes, either of those would be fabulous there! They did just plant a little Olive near the Opuntia, didn't get a picture of it.

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  10. I admire your neighbor's garden and their restraint. Unlike me, they know when to stop.

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    1. Me, too. I don't know when to stop where plants are concerned, and I hope I don't figure it out too quickly.

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  11. Well, there it is, and given the space and backdrop it deserves. My big one is pupping again. Your pup is several years old and might be the prettiest. You're right, it does look better in the ground, but unfortunately I've got no place of honor like that to give it.

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