Where Fall Is Spring

There are so many flowers in the garden, I normally ignore foliage.  After last week's multi-day drizzle, foliage washed clean of summer's dust drew my eyes.  Suddenly the local hills have a hint of green again.
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Hellebore argutifolius finally has new growth!  It sat for an entire year with no growth at all, produced a couple of new leaves last winter, but now it's truly awake.  Flowers soon, I expect.
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Aloe polyphylla spent the hot three months from August to October shaded by a piece of cardboard and watered by a trickling hose. It looked slightly stressed by October, though the foliage never lost turgidity.  I hope for some growth soon.
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Euonymous 'Chollipo' looks dull and bleached in summer.  Rich color again:
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Dewy Aeonium:
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Aloe pseudorubroviolacaea:
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 Senecio vitalis, Agave stricta, Agave augustifolia:
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Hidden beneath her skirt of leaves, beautiful Yucca linearfolia...
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...has an offset!  Is late winter the best time to harvest it?
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The little baby Crape Myrtles are losing their foliage for the winter.  They colored up beautifully red:
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While I admire foliage, bees mob 'Fourth Of July'.
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Boris was far less motivated.
Photobucket With the garden washed clean, here where Fall is Spring.
 
 

Comments

  1. You have such beautiful foliage! That yucca is glorious as is your combination of senecio and agaves - Yum! Boris knows what season it is - time to Fall down and take a nap!

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    1. Boris always knows what time it is: dinner time. ;)

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  2. Lots of exciting stuff in this post! First, I never thought I'd be saying this, but I love that Euonymous! Second, Aloe pseudorubroviolacaea is my new favorite species name. Third, the Yucca offset is exciting! I wish it were a bit more cold hardy, as I'd add one to my collection for sure.

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    1. I confess I bought the Aloe for the name alone.

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  3. Great photos. The Yucca linearfolia is a lovely plant.

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    1. Thanks Spiky! That Yucca is truly elegant.

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  4. Though I always thought in So Cal, "fall comes in winter, and winter not at all". At least San Diego says that! But with those green hills and now-happy plants, you're onto something.

    Seems you should not be deceived by moving offsets until it's warming up, late winter or spring, like you think. I think most of those plants are from drier, cooler winter areas, and may appreciate being moved when soil temps are warmer so they can re-establish better.

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    1. Yes I thought when the soil starts to warm, but not so late in spring that the summer heat hits a vulnerable root system.

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