March Foliage

Some green (and bronze, and silver) for St. Patrick's Day.  The new Leucadendron linifolium is settling in and looks happy: photo leucadendron2293_zps2539aca5.jpg 
Dew on new rose foliage:
Dew photo dew2386_zps0fa1ed2f.jpg
And I must show a weed, since I am yanking dozens and dozens of these every day--sprouting seeds from the Cercis occidentalis trees I dug up last year.  Their attempt at revenge.  How many more years will I be yanking these things?  Cercis occidentalis photo cercis2292_zpsd2da7d6c.jpg
I will be happy to admire Cercis and the spring pink of its flowers from afar, as afar as I can.  
Close enough:

Cercis photo cercis2418_zpse1c2935d.jpg
This unknown Agave has changed significantly since I bought it back in 2011.  The beautiful banding and medium green color are gone...
 photo gsb8626.jpg
replaced with a frosty, unbanded honeydew melon green.  I like it this way, too.  This illustrates a bit of how juvenile Agaves can look quite different from their adult appearance. 
Unknown Agave photo 
hot2364_zps7f7a87e3.jpg
Agave augustifolia 'Marginata' with Agave desmetiana 'Variegata' and pink-stemmed Oscularia deltoides:
 photo agave2296_zps56c0f007.jpg
And that's some March foliage.  

Comments

  1. The agaves with Oscularia deltoides...my favorite trick, soft and sharp!

    Though I know this is foliage post,your Redbud against the shaded building is something...ours should be blooming now, but maybe later this week?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well in my case the Oscularia mixing it up with the Agaves was a happy accident.

      Yes I admire my neighbor's 'Forest Pansy', it's vastly nicer than the C. occidentalis we had.

      Delete
  2. What, no shamrocks? (Sorry, couldn't resist.)
    All this time you've been dealing with and discussing the Cercis, and I never twigged that it was a western redbud you were talking about. Huh. That last shot is lovely with the spikes and the pink-stemmed Oscularia (which I won't even bother to look up for hardiness here.) ;(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oscularia is hardy to somewhere around 18F. :)

      Shamrocks? Shamrocks are for places that get rain.

      Delete
  3. To answer the Cercis seedling question, probably until your dying day! (but more likely just for one more season.) I didn't know that agaves changed coloration like that as they matured but then I don't know a whole lot about them. Your new rose foliage with dew and sunshine is beautiful.

    ReplyDelete

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