November in May

It's one of those days when Mother Nature reminds me that roses belong in a wetter climate.  'Fair Bianca', not so fair now. 
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It could be worse.  Elsewhere in our region, that which we all fear...
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Godspeed and safety, firefighters.  Normally we get this type of weather in October or November;  for this heat, May is somewhat more rare.  
Eight AM:
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Four PM:
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'Golden Celebration's spring flush:
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Eight AM:
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Four PM:
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90F (32C).  Ninety isn't so bad, but the 8% relative humidity is hard on flowers. 
Some plants are oblivious.  Those you'd expect:
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Those you wouldn't expect.  Afternoon shade makes a big difference.
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Afternoon sun:
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I've got tiny tomato seedlings to keep alive.  A drench every three hours.
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The Aeoniums engulfed in Sedum 'Angelina' flowers are fine.
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I've been so agog over the roses lately, I hardly noticed the Sedum.
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The Koi stay wet.
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Heat makes them hungry.
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We are predicted to drop thirty degrees and gain 92% in relative humidity by Sunday.  





Comments

  1. I cannot believe how fast your roses dry up! Unbelievable! The photos of Golden Celebration really say it all. And I thought it got hot here...

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    Replies
    1. Combo of heat, wind, and the low low humidity. If it was just heat they'd not be so brown and crispy.

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  2. Poor roses and tomatoe plants, they have a hard time. 32 degr.C. we only have a few times on the hottest summerdays.

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    Replies
    1. We don't get 32C that often, thankfully!

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  3. Wow, that's rough weather. Water seedlings every three hours? That's dedication! Shade cloth may be the answer.

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    Replies
    1. The Shade cloth blew away. The seedlings survived, yay!!

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  4. Gosh dear Hoover, I am sorry that you are experiencing such high temperatures and bush fires, they are always a worry and frightening. Your poor flowers. I hope the temperatures drop for you.
    It will be Winter here in just over three weeks and the temperatures are still in the high twenties (celsius) during the day. I am dreading next Summer if these are any indication of what is to come.
    xoxoxo ♡

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, those hot summers--we're worried here, too. It was a very short heat spell, we'll be back to seasonal temps tomorrow, thankfully.

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  5. I read about the fires in our morning paper, doesn't bode well for the rest of the summer does it? We've got out own little mini heat-wave going with 80 today and 85 predicted for Saturday and Sunday. Today I plant my new agaves, seems fitting...

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    Replies
    1. Yes, the thought of summer is making me somewhat uneasy. Though the Agaves will be fine, right?

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  6. Glad our plants are used to such temperatures and lack of humidity, so they don't react that way. May your marine layer come back, and that horrible wildfire be put out. On the other extreme, near or below freezing lows in much of NM and TX...hard to believe I'm happy for my 33F low. Maybe it's done? Both your weather and mine is caused by the same wack-o pattern.

    Interesting on the shade patterns for some plants. Out of the wind , too?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, also being out of the wind made a huge difference. It is a wack-o pattern, the jet stream is way up in Alaska--its snowing up there again, which is late, even for them.

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  7. Weird weather we have been receiving here. My roses reacted poorly to the extreme dry heat too. same with the rest of my garden :-( There goes the water bill!

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  8. Weird weather blown our way. My roses reacted poorly to the dry heat too. Same with most of the garden....required an extra drink. There goes the water bill!

    Love your koi!

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  9. I have been lamenting the weeks of rain and snow here-- soil is too wet for me to walk on it. I think of your garden as perfect- always roses in bloom. Thanks for sharing the bad with the good. I guess no gardener has the perfect climate. So sorry about your beautiful morning blooms turning mummy by afternoon. That has to be hard to take!

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    Replies
    1. If only we could get some of your rain here--then we'd both be happy!

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  10. Wow! I've always hated the high humidity here, until now!

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    Replies
    1. It's never perfect, is it? That's gardening!

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  11. Your post captured the whole thing perfectly and put it all into perspective as well. Brava.

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  12. I'm sorry to see that your beautiful roses took a hit. I had similar experiences with the plants in my garden despite what I thought was a preemptive strike with hoses and sprinklers. I'm glad to see that temps are dropping as predicted. Now if we could just get some rain too...

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    Replies
    1. A little rain would be lovely, wouldn't it? We can dream...

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  13. Oh, how sad. I hope the fires are under control soon and that your roses recover.

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    Replies
    1. Temperatures have dropped significantly, humidity is way up, wind is gone. Things are looking better. :)

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