Stump Victory Declared

 Are they applauding?
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The stump is out, and part way up the stairs
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Mow-Blow Guy has been busy, so I got the stump out of the hole and put all the soil back myself.   The stump is out of the way for the time being.  I got the stump out of the deep hole by pushing it one way, filling in some of the soil into the place where the stump wasn't, and then pushing the stump back onto the newly filled, slightly higher area.  Then I shoveled soil into the low area where the stump just was.  Repeat, repeat, repeat until I raised the stump to the level of the wall and levered it out onto the stairs.  No lifting.  When you do not have strength, use patience. 
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Newly declared stump-free zone:
 photo stump5207_zps70624a62.jpg To the left of that terra-cotta colored pot:
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Ready to plant.
 photo stump5201_zpsf98899a0.jpg 
My audience was impressed.
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When you do not have strength, use patience.  It works, too.  
 
  

Comments

  1. Nice job! Oh, and I get so jealous when people post lizard photos from their gardens.

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    Replies
    1. The garden is teeming with lizards, to my infinite gratitude.

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  2. Well done! that's exactly how we get giant rocks out of planting holes. That stump almost looks like a piece of sculpture

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    Replies
    1. It's a nice stump, as stumps go, but it feels as if it weighs 200 lbs...

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  3. Oooh, lizard applause! How gratifying! Congrats on MacGyvering the evil stump. And what is the name of that stunning daylily?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, onederw. The daylily is a seedling from the year I played with daylily hybridizing.

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  4. Wow! Congratulations! You need to get yourself something really special (and manageable) for that spot to celebrate.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kris. 'Princess Alexandra Of Kent' rose gets the spot. I hope she likes it.

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  5. This reminds me of the fable about a frog (or was it a lizard?) who was saved from drowning in a well (or was it a stump hole?) by having his companions repeatedly push rocks into the hole so that the frog was held above the water level and could eventually climb out.

    Good work! Being smaller and not so strong, I am also a big believer in patience.

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  6. Good work! And now you can use the stump as an objet d'art. Looks like driftwood to me. Or hang it on the wall as a trophy, like a lion's head.

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    Replies
    1. I don't have the talent to make that stump into something interesting, so its future appears being ground into mulch.

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  7. Very cool! Do you have plans for the stump?

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    Replies
    1. Mother Nature has plans for the stump. :)

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  8. Well done dear Hoover, a little patience and some leverage always works...well most times.
    I love the colour of the flower in image #1 and the lizard is gorgeous.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Dianne. Leverage is a wonderful thing.

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  9. Congratulations on your victory and for the idea if I'm ever faced with a similar situation!

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  10. I so wish I could have fence lizards and your beautiful masonry walls are just what they like. I did see a fence lizard in my yard, and also an alligator lizard and some skinks, back before my daughter left her cat here with us. There have been a couple of sightings recently so they may be making a comeback, I try to make some piles of branches in places, and mulch with some newspaper, which gives the lizards and garter snakes some hiding places and cover. Congrats on getting rid of your stump, quite an accomplishment, and worth rewarding yourself with a lovely Austin rose.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Hannah. I actually got the rose last year, so it was a "preward", I guess you could say!

      I love the lizards and feel lucky to have so many around. I've seen a skink or two as well, and toads, and the occasional froggie. Here kitties must stay in the house lest they be eaten by Wile E. Coyote. :(

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