Wildlife Sighting Of The Week

It made staying in the house and vacuuming a very attractive option:
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The first thing you look for here when you see a snake is a rattle;  no rattle.  I think it was a gopher snake.  In no hurry at all, it slid slowly under the Cornflower by the front door.  What was I so afraid of?  The snake was less than five feet (150 cm) long.
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It was last seen sashaying up into the neighbor's bougainvillea.  I hope you understand why I didn't make a strong effort for better photos. 
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Lots of hiding place under the Hydrangea, unfortunately:
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Flowers always calm me down. 
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No hidey space here:
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This seedling rose is three inches tall.  I moved it to the same area as the first seedling rose that bloomed, and watered it well.  Obviously another offspring of 'Fourth Of July'. 
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There now.  I've almost forgotten about the snake.  The house is all vacuumed, too.    
  

Comments

  1. The only snakes in my yard are garter snakes. I have to provide cover for them so the cat will not kill them. I am very grateful not to have poisonous snakes here. I lived on top of a ridge between canyons in California and had rattlers migrating through my garden, I had several close encounters. But I had to collect snakes in college so am not afraid of non-poisonous ones, I am a biologist. How wonderful to have a seedling Fourth of July rose! That's one flower I haven't learned to grow from seed, nor have I ever seen one volunteer.

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    1. Collecting snakes--you are far braver than I!!! No wonder I chose computer science.

      It's quite a surprise to see seedling roses, but we forget that is how they all start out.

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  2. I hate snakes, I have had quite a few in my garden over the years. My son and I managed to catch a very large diamond python which we re-located to the bushland in my street, hope it stays there.
    Your flowers are beautiful, glorious colours in the daylilies.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. I think they are fine, just somewhere other than here! Hope your python stays far away. Far, far away...

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  3. I'm fine with snakes of all sizes and kinds...but not into the diamondbacks...always need to watch in our places where we walk! But then, we also see such beauty.

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    1. Our rainfall was so low this winter I think they are moving to gardens looking for food. I do hope the rattlers don't appear as well.

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  4. Yikes! O.K. I don't envy your climate today! Snakes are beautiful but it's the surprise factor that makes me scream like a little girl. In western Washington, we only have little garter snakes and in my urban garden, not even those. I can't imagine the unwelcome surprise of reaching down to pull weeds and pulling a snake instead!

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    1. Yep, I screamed like a little girl when I saw it. Don't tell anyone, okay?

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  5. A snake, harmless or not, would hustle me into the house too. It's a good thing your pups didn't get hold of it!

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    1. I was so glad they were in the house!

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  6. That snake.........glad we never see them here. I should run for my life, haha.

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    1. You might have heard me scream. I was loud!

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  7. YOWZA! Less than 5 feet? Well, that's a relief. Does it bite?

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    1. They do, but strictly for defense. Kept my distance and it completely ignored me.

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  8. Only little snakes round these city environs, and none at all in my garden. Now raccoons, that's a different story: they feel as dangerous as rattlers to me sometimes.

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    1. Don't like raccoons either. My lack of trees helps there.

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  9. Several of our local non-venomous snakes will rattle their tails against foliage to mimic a rattlesnake. Knowing this still makes me shudder.

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    1. I didn't know snakes do that, interesting! Though I try not to think about snakes at all. One species of gopher snake will flare out it's neck to imitate the head of a rattler, but I do not think it was the species in the yard.

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