Meanwhile, Back On The Slope

A month--two months ago?  I had a contractor come out to give me an estimate for converting the irrigation on the west slope to drip, and for adding a block path at the top of the slope, and a few other things.  What I got was an estimate for the irrigation only, for $5,000!  Obviously that translates to:  "Don't want the job."

Why not just say so?  Jeeze.  A waste of their time and mine.  Anyway, I decided I'd better do the irrigation myself.  So right now, the slope looks like gophers have invaded.  So far, I've capped off some of the sprinkler heads.  
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I've moved the Teucrium, which seems fine with being moved, at least so far.  Great plant.
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I'm eyeing what can be moved--or removed.  Most of the slope is empty, with just a layer of mulch.  The citrus trees will stay.  Otherwise, there are just a few plants left.  I got rid of the original three 'Margaritaville'  Yuccas, the roots of which are now sprouting many new plantlings. 
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Anyone want one?  I'll try to save some and dig out the roots--if I can.  Are Yuccas forever?  

I am wondering if I can move the Ceanothus 'Yankee Point' without killing it.  Likely not.  Oh, why did I plant it there?
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I think the Galvezia speciosa are movable.  I dug up a bit last year and replanted it elsewhere, and it didn't even seem to notice the move.  The hummingbirds really like this plant--more than I do, but if they like it, I'll keep it.  It's so much fun to watch those ornery little birds fight each other over red tiny flowers.
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Part of the slope has a big patch of Russian sage--it's beautiful, but...
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...I would really like a blank slate to work with.
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I'm expecting the elephant on the slope, this Agave...
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...to bloom soon and die.  Like--tomorrow would be good.  I've harvested plenty of offsets.  It's....ohhh...but I really want a blank slate.  Decisions, decisions.  It's so beautiful!  
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 I think getting the irrigation done will be at least some accomplishment.  Beloved has been kind enough to provide some of his considerable intellectual ability in planning--which has been extremely helpful.  So, I'm continuing to flounder my way though this project, but hopeful.  In the meantime, the Wooly Blue Curls are still alive.  
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Comments

  1. What a job! I take it that the planting scheme you have in mind once the new irrigation system is in doesn't involve agaves? It looks so happy on that slope. Maybe you can offer it free to a local gardener willing to risk puncture wounds to dig it up.

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    1. Agaves are definitely on the plan--I just plunked that one right in the middle--it could be better placed. I'll leave it. I just hope I can get the drip lines around it without much distortion.

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  2. "Yuccas are forever"...catchy.

    $5,000!!! At least they gave you an estimate. One of the guys I had bid our fence spent about 40 minutes or so telling me why what I wanted to do couldn't be done. So after I agreed to all of his changes (just to humor him) and asked him to get back to me with a cost he never did, LAME!

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    1. Based on the root systems, Yuccas may well be forever. One of my neighbors dug out a 20' Yucca gigantea last year. He said it just about killed him. He ended up renting a big machine to get it out. I just noticed the other day that it's resprouting.

      At least, in the end, you got your fence. A garden project is usually a circuitous journey, isn't it?

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  3. The agave is stunning. I would guess it is a few years off flowering though.

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    1. Yes, likely a few. I guess it will stay until then.

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  4. Are you adding some type of pressure regulator to control the added pressure to the drip lines. I've had quite a bit of trial and error with drip and I finally learned from some contractors in Colorado to add pressure regulators and/ or flow control valves for the lower pressure needed with drip. I don't envy your job.

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    1. As a matter of fact I was up on the slope this afternoon with Dear Husband looking at the valve and figuring out how where the pressure regulator is going to go. I found a great DIY irrigation tutorial on line: irrigationtutorials.com Lots of good info. Also the netafim site had sample layouts for slopes, showing what parts to get, how to lay out, and so forth. I am hopeful. Or at least sufficiently deluded...

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  5. I'm surprised some contractors still spend some time beating around the bush when they don't want the job in the first place...

    Keep the agave, it looks great! Btw, can it have one of those Margaritaville pups please? :) Only if you can be bothered to bring it to Portland though. We'll take it back with us without soil.

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    1. I'll bring some if I can dig out something that looks like it will be viable. Likely someone else will want one too.

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  6. Yes yes yes a million times yes. You had me at free yucca :)

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  7. What a job ahead of you dear Hoover! I know you would like a blank slate to make the plumbing access easier but the little yucca plantlets are beautiful and so is the Russian sage, the bees love that. Good luck my friend.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. Thank you, Dianne. You are always so kind.

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  8. Ooh..the FLOWER produced by the wooly blue curls! Made me forget all about the nature of your project.

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    1. Lots better looking than the project, that's certain.

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