TRITELEIA laxa 'Queen Fabiola'

Triteleia laxa 'Queen Fabiola'

Triteleia (aka Brodiaea) was one of the very first things I planted in the garden, back in 2000.  I don't think I've ever taken a photograph of it, or blogged about it.  Or watered it.  Or cared for it in any way.  Or paid much attention to it at all.  
What I've been missing:
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Triteleia is an edible(!) corm native to the Western United States.  Northern California in particular is home to many species.  'Queen Fabiola', a cultivar or selection, is readily available for sale.  
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Mine came from a big box store in a package marked "Plant your very own blue garden!", marked down 90%.  The package contained a blue bearded iris, a few Dutch Iris bulbs, and the Triteleia.  The Iris are long forgotten, or never grew, while the Triteleia go on and on. 
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It's effortless, living and blooming on winter rain alone, even when winter rain is about 5" total, as it has been for the past two years.
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It wasn't completely effortless to photograph.  I had to crawl behind a rose and squeeze against a wall to reach where the Triteleia quietly lives, forgotten. 
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Forgotten no more.

Comments

  1. I've occasionally been tempted to dig up my Camassia tubers and give them a try. But then common sense prevails. Your Triteleia is a gorgeous, deep blue native flower, so pretty.

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    Replies
    1. If the Big One strikes, knowing what's edible and what's not won't hurt.

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  2. It is a great blue, worth the effort to get those photos.

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    Replies
    1. Well, it wasn't that difficult. It is a lovely blue, though.

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  3. The blue flowers are gorgeous dear Hoover, it sounds like an ideal, easy care plant.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    Replies
    1. I need to pay more attention to that kind of plant.

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  4. Will you be planting more of this beauty?

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    Replies
    1. I think I will. In all the spaces on the slope between Agaves and Aloes, a touch of blue...

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  5. It sounds like something I need! Does it really get 2+ feet tall?

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    Replies
    1. Mine are just about 16" I think, but maybe if they got some actual irrigation, or more rain, they'd make it to 24".

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  6. We have T. laxa 'Corinna' in the NW Territory and it's a softer, lighter blue. I like your dark, saturated blue much better!

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    Replies
    1. Interesting. I've never seen anything but QF. I wonder if a mix of that and 'Corinna' might not be cool.

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  7. Hidden treasure...often the best kind.

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