Echeveria 'Imbricata' Before And After Water; Recent Acquisitions

The oooh of the new:

This Echeveria 'Imbricata' cluster was getting zero irrigation and would have died by summer's end.  I moved it to a better place. 
June 7, 2014:
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Here is the cluster after a few days of water, on June 13, 2014:
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I love that plant. 
I've been swooning over the variegated version, which seems to be available in Australia and in the UK, but has not been seen here in the US, until now...! I got it at the Succulent Celebration in Escondido last week. 
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Swoon.  Update:  the above swooned alright, but not in a good way.  I either killed it it died.  Should have babied it, I guess. 

Also Echeveria harmsii 'Ruby Slippers', which is pinker/redder than the straight species.  Update:  growing and very much alive a year later.
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From Trader Joe's, a very pretty Dahlia for $5.99.  It was wilting and bone-dry, but perked right up after I rushed it home and soaked it.  3" flowers.  Update:  died.  No more TJ Dahlias for moi.
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Not an aquistion, but a new insect in the garden.  The dragonflies I see are usually orange;  this is a different one.  
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This lily is not new.  This is its third year.  This year it is fasciated--the stem is flattened.  It's also forked into two. 
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'Etoile Violette', not new, but I give it an "Oooh!"
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Comments

  1. Lots of plants worth oohing over.
    Well do everything for finding your variegated ephemera. They are lovely plants

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    1. Typed that comment from new tablet and just noticed auto-correct must be one. The second sentence should have read "Well done for finding your variegated echeveria", well done or translating my original.

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    2. Looks like auto-correct is still one. ;^)

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  2. Oooh indeed! These are all beautiful! That lily is crazy man.

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    1. It's a California lily. It's what we do here.

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  3. Your Echeveria harmsii looks remarkably like the Echeveria sold to me as E. pulvinata 'Ruby' - succulent labeling (and classifications) can be frustrating. Re the lily, do you think the heat in May could have caused the flattening and branching of the stems? I've discovered other oddities this year, like stunting of the spikes of Digitalis purpurea, and assume that either the early spike in temperatures or irrigation restrictions (or a combination of the 2) must be accountable.

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    1. Good point. Looking at the John Pilbeam Echeveria book, they are two different species, harmsii apparently with thinner and narrower leaves. There seems to be widespread confusion on the internet--one site even calling the 'Ruby' plant "harmsii or pulvinata". I wish I knew more.

      The lily spikes were certainly developing as we had those two nasty May heat spells, so perhaps that did it.

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    2. Here we go, here we go. One vs. the other.

      http://crassulaceae.ch/index.php?TPL=10122&x270_id=1422
      and...
      http://crassulaceae.ch/index.php?TPL=10122&x270_id=1696

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    3. Thanks for the research. It gives me new respect for the intricacies of the classification process.

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  4. The variegated Echeveria looks very exotic and beautiful.

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  5. They all have the ooh factor, what a difference some water makes to their beauty. Love the new dragonfly dear Hoover,
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. It is weird, but the dragonfly's head looks like the back of Darth Vader's helmet. I hope we get some more of them here, as they eat many bad bugs.

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  6. Lovely Echeveria! I have got a bit of a craze about succulents lately, as I got a hole tray of baby succulents from a plant swapping friend a couple of weeks ago, and amongst them was 4 different baby echeverias – without names. So frustrating, I’d love to know what they are, but she had no idea. Yours is so interesting, with variegated leaves, I must look for it over here! Your clematis is a stunner!

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    1. Thanks, Helene. They are fun plants, and so easy here. For you, maybe a little more difficult with your colder winters.

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  7. Imbricata is drool-worthy.

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