Front, 2014

February 18th
 photo frontyard3918_zps8dc45739.jpg
March 5th
 photo frontyard4278_zps7a8f0c26.jpg
March 11th
 photo frontyard4278_zps7a8f0c26.jpg
March 21st
 photo frontyard4766_zpsd232f5ba.jpg
March 28th
 photo frontyard4766_zpsd232f5ba.jpg
April 13th
 photo FrontYard5810_zps6e223f9f.jpg
June 24th
 photo FrontYard8749_zpsd31bbf8f.jpg
 July 15.  How about that Lagerstroemia 'Dynamite'.
 photo FrontJuly0516_zpsf6dc8441.jpg
December 21:
 photo aawide5518_zps9b7cc52b.jpg
 
We do not have the drama of everything bursting into life after a winter of snow, or of frost-killed foliage.  It is a subtle progression (and towards the end of the year, regression).

I'll have to remember to update this post for the rest of the year.  The consistency of bloom from the orange flowered rose near the center of the pictures ('Wildfire', Zary, 2004) is going to be interesting. 

Comments

  1. A beautiful progression! I wouldn't have thought that there would be such a difference in a garden in sunny California where I imagine roses blooming 365 days a year. A northerner's fantasy about the warm south.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well they would bloom 365 if they didn't get cut back in winter, but they need their cut back to be truly pretty.

      Delete
  2. Slow progression or not, it's beautiful, and very satisfying!

    ReplyDelete
  3. What a great series of photos! As the roses appeared, I felt some of the changes from one period to the next were quite dramatic. What's the shrub just outside the circular bump out? It changes quite a bit as the season progresses too. Your front view is spectacular, Hoover Boo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those are the 'Dynamite' Crape Myrtles. They are growing fairly fast, and will be 15' multi-branched trees in a few years. They are about to start blooming--maybe I can get the flowers in the next photo.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful photos, your garden is a real Piece of Eden!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love this kind of look at the garden's growth. Once again, you have me swooning over roses (and that's no mean feat.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Roses don't work everywhere, but they do work here. Glad you liked the post.

      Delete
  6. Beautiful! I want all those roses! Waaahhhh!! The blackspot battle continues here.... I'm really looking forward to meeting you at the Blogger Fling. :o)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Looking forward to meeting you as well. According to the itinerary, one of the lunches is will be at the Rose Test garden. We can compare opinions!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow. What a perfect illustration of change. I'm not a big fan of roses--mostly because here in the Sacramento Valley they're typically covered with aphids--but yours look lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Roses are spiky, ya know. They must be related to Agaves somehow.

      Delete
    2. LOL. Roses are the European equivalent of agaves :-)

      Delete
    3. Well they are both rosette in shape, right?

      Delete

Post a Comment

Always interested in your thoughts.

Any comments containing a link to a commercial site with the intent to promote that site will be deleted. Thank you for your understanding on this matter.

Popular Posts