What's The Gardening Difference Between Portland And Southern California?

In Portland, the conifers are green.  And big.  
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Here, well...  
But, that's a nice Eriobotrya delflexa at the bottom of the photo.
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In California, the landscape rocks are from Arizona.  In Oregon, the landscape rocks are from Oregon.
And it rains in July!
 photo akuzma0098_zps07bf08c3.jpg In Oregon, the Agaves are--small.  That's weird.  They look beautiful, though. 
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Here, the Agaves are as big as Escalades.     photo sdTecomaStansAgaveAmericanaYucca7570_zps08fcb928.jpg
But we have lots of trouble with conifers...
If it's strong and healthy--we can correct that with skillful pruning!
 photo treemutilation6408_zps5e92c1ae.jpg 
In Oregon, every time I saw an Agave planted next to a dwarf conifer I would giggle.  I'm just jealous of the Hostas.
Oregon has glorious Hostas.
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Here, there are not Hostas.  We have pretend Hostas.
Alstroemeria 'Rock and Roll' photo 3-7-4296_zps0d333cc3.jpg
In Oregon, Eucalyptus are treasured, mannerly exotics of exquisite color and grace that die to the ground in the winter.
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 Here...Ha ha ha!  Treasured!  Ha ha ha!  Where's my chainsaw?
 photo 6-10-2014-8388_zpsb206b8ff.jpg In Oregon, they have white-frosted Fatsias.  We don't.  Dammit!
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But we have orange trees.  So we're even. 
Valencia orange tree photo harvest1250_zpsf3163b0d.jpg
 In Oregon, the lilies are ten feet tall and the Aloes rot over the winter. 
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In Southern California, the Aloes are ten feet tall and the lilies rot over the winter.
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In Oregon, there are woodpiles in the driveways. 
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Here, if we want to see a fire, we watch one on TV.

In Oregon, the garden companions are simply adorable.
Looky here!  Looky there!  All those people came on a big bus to pet me!
Lila photo adif0430_zps616cdd56.jpg 


They are here, too.   
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In that, we are the same.

Comments

  1. I guess the guestion is, is your garden style more suited to southern California or Oregon? I think I would opt for your climate, although I would need a bigger garden for those car sized agaves!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Style? Me? Never!

      And no matter what we grow, we don't we always need a bigger garden?

      Delete
  2. Great and clever comparison between the two. When it comes to pets it is definitely level.

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  3. Fun! Similar to Oregon and South Texas. Agave americana in a pot? In Texas the small ones go in the compost.

    Love the photo of Lila.

    The frosted Fatsia is gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Agave americana in a pot. Can't imagine it even after seeing it in person.

      That frosted Fatsia was perfect!

      Delete
  4. I hope you left here just a little bit envious...it's only fair.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Replies
    1. It's nice to see How The Other Gardener lives.

      Delete
  6. That Fatsia is nowhere to be seen here either. I just don't get it.

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  7. Love that shot of Lila!

    The rain in July is VERY unusual, even more unusual is that we got almost .4" today with another storm coming tomorrow. I can count on one hand when that's happened and still have fingers left to poke with my tiny agave spikes. Not complaining mind you, free water from the sky during the dry months is a treat. Wish I could send some your way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope it mitigated the wildfires in your state somewhat. When it rained at the Floramagoria garden, at first I assumed their irrigation system was elevated and they turned it on to get rid of us all. The rain was as much a treat as the garden...almost.

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  8. P.S. I hope to get to per Boris and Natasha someday...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And where can I get that spider web Fatsia?!?

      Delete
    2. Well, come on down. We have a guest room. So happy I got to meet super-cute Lila, and your Andrew seemed like a gem.

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    3. http://plantlust.com/plants/fatsia-japonica-spiders-web/

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    4. I did look there before I wrote that! No one had it actually for sale. Out of stock, not available, etc. Well, maybe in the autumn...

      Delete
  9. I think that R. mutabilis in the Kuzma garden says it all about the difference between the two.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That a bit of winter does 'Mutabilis' a great deal of good. Flowering was always so scattered for me I got rid of it quickly.

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  10. LOL love this! That Fatsia is dreamy

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    Replies
    1. The plain Fatsia is one of the most boring plants I can think of. That one is different.

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  11. I absolutely loved this post!!

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  12. Thanks for this! I often covet your climate so it was nice to see that there are a few things that prefer ours. Still, oranges on a tree, outside...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True, you can't eat a Hosta...but your climate has all those wonderful berry farms...

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  13. How I envy your ability to grow citrus. I think you win, just for that.

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    Replies
    1. Both are good. We are all winners, just in different ways, no? But the perfurme of orange blossom on a spring evening...

      Delete

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