That Rose Will Go Unpruned...



 ...until the hummingbird chicks are fledged. The nest, perhaps 2" (5 cm) in diameter, is lined with milkweed seed tufts, which is how I spotted it--watching a hummingbird carrying puffs of milkweed fiber in her beak back and forth to the nest. 
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There's Mama Hummer, taking a rest.  She does look a bit round.
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The boyfriend, who lives around the corner of the house guarding the Salvia discolor and the Aloe thraskii.
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There will be plenty of nectar for support.  Besides Salvia discolor, Aloe thraskii is just opening.
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And around front, there are several Salvia 'Wendy's Wish', more Aloes.  'Joe Hoak' is finally blooming also.
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Hummer's eye view:
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Good luck, little hummers.  The rose pruning can wait. 


Comments

  1. How wonderful! I hope all goes well. They do pick the oddest spots to build nests. At our old house, one built a nest in Bougainvillea adjacent to the garage (before the plant was unceremoniously removed by my husband) and, every time the garage door opened, it was shaken. Despite limiting our use of the garage, the nest was eventually abandoned.

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    1. Your husband managed to get rid of a Bougainvillea? Oy. That must have been a not-fun job.

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  2. So glad you spotted that nest, keen eyed gardener that you are.

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    1. Hummers are major entertainment here. :^)

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  3. Ahhww that's sweet! First time for me to see a hummingbird nest too

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    1. The construction is impressive! A base layer to hold onto the cane, then a layer of circles of grass/fibers, then the liner of milkweed/dog hair.

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  4. How lovely to have the nest in your garden, birds are very busy when nest building, coming and going with their nest materials. I don't know how they find the energy as hummingbirds are so tiny. Your aloes are beautiful and it is very exciting to see the flowers opening on Joe Hoak, they are spectacular.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. It's a privilege to have a garden, isn't it? So many wonderful things take place there, if we have the time to look for them.

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  5. The hummingbirds are nesting now? I didn't know that hummingbirds nested this time of year, even in CA. Great picture of the male and the two pictures below complement that picture beautifully as well.

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    1. They will start nesting around January here. Plenty of food. I used to put out a feeder, but the flower sources are healthier for them.

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  6. A precious scene. Hummer nests are usually too high to spot so this is a special treat to see all the action through your post.

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    1. The nest is just barely tucked under the little balcony on the front of the house, so I will try to take a mirror out on the balcony and see if I can see the mama bird sitting on eggs in a few days. A quick glance only...

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  7. Beautiful. Hard to imagine just how tiny those baby hummers will be.

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  8. So nice to see these lovely hummingbirds and now they are even making a next in your garden, wonderful!

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    1. That's what I get for planting all those Aloes. :^)

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  9. This is the cutest thing I have ever saw. I was just commenting to my husband how we don't have any hummingbirds in our garden. I know they live around here. But, for some reason I have never seen one in my garden. I do get tons of butterflies, birds, possums and even a parrot or two. But no hummers.

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    1. They may be around without you knowing--they move so fast!

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  10. That's a much more charming scene with the dainty hummers than the carnage in our jacaranda, where a hawk has decided it makes the perfect staging ground for the carcasses of his pigeon prey. I've got a couple agave/mangave bloom spikes coming along to detain the hummers briefly -- love that whir of wings as they "engage!" in and out of the garden.

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    1. Isn't that why pigeons exist? Hawks gotta eat, too.

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