Monday, April 6, 2015

Color Confusion

Muddy tangerine?  Greyish orange??  Greenish Coral??? 

What color is that, anyway?  It's x Graptosedum 'Vera Higgins';  a cross between Graptopetalum paraguayensis and Sedum stahlii.  Staring at it, trying to figure out what color it really is, can be entertaining. 

This was a big-box purchase.  There was 'California' in the name.  This one is greenish-red, or bronzy green? 
  
No question about this one, Sedum nussbaumerianum (or adophi) 'Coppertone', from Vera Cruz State, Mexico.  It's...um, copper?  Orangey-golden? 
 Definitely more copper--or is it bronze?  Kalanchloe orgyalis, from Madagascar.  In less sun, less metal color--it goes grey-green.

Something less confusing.  Wooly Blue Curls, Tricostemna lanatum. There's wooly, blue, and curls.  Don't you love a little straightforwardness? 
Reportedly difficult in soggy clay.  In our floury silt, it's been effortless. 
Sure is pretty.  

No color confusion here, except by the digital camera--'Young Lycidas' is a royal pain to photograph.  Digital cameras have mostly conquered the problem of crimson, but magenta can still wreck havoc.  The color is much better in person.  
 I am proud to note that I'm not as totally color confused as in the past--the next photo illustrates I've linked the foreground bit of the garden with the middle distance via the same color.  I did that on purpose!  (Also because there was space there and I needed a new spot for 'Young Lycidas'.)  Wow!  Am I finally becoming a "real" gardener? 
 It's lovely not to be totally confused--at least for a few minutes.   

18 comments:

  1. Oh, so does that mean that our foregrounds need to match our middle- and/or backgrounds? That small detail had escaped me. I guess that makes me completely color confused!

    That last photo of your garden is lovely.

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    1. Oopsie! What I was trying to say and not doing very well is that the eye will bounce from pink in the foreground to pink in the middle to pink in the farther distance. It's what human eyes/brains do, bounce around their view, looking for patterns.

      Now, see? I'm still confused, and confusing! ;-)

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  2. Beautiful bright colours dear Hoover, I love the colour of the Sedums and the Kalanchloe orgyalis is a wonderful colour.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. Color does something good for the spirit. All-green gardens are so elegant and sophisticated, but splashes of bright color give such joy...

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  3. Your rose color echoes are perfect! Judging succulent colors is made even more difficult by the fact they change so readily based on the amount of water, sun and cold they get. The Graptosedum in the second photograph may be 'California Sunset,' one of my favorites.

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    1. That's it, 'California Sunset'. The colors change a lot--part of the fun. :)

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  4. I agree with digital cameras and magenta! What's up with that?

    I also know that people see different hues differently. I've had endless discussions with my wife on pink vs. purple. I guess that's why the Royal Horticultural Society in the UK has their standardized color charts.

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    1. They got red right--finally. Maybe magenta is next. It seems like it reflects a lot of light--maybe that is the problem. The sensor can't handle it.

      'Young Lycidas' does have purple shades that don't show up on the camera.

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  5. How long have you had your woolly blue curls?

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    1. Planted May of 2014--not the right time to plant, but it's done well.

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    2. Amazing. I have tried them a few times, and mine have never lasted more than a few months. Congrats!

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    3. After the planting I read that this plant is considered a "pioneer plant"--one of those that appears when all plants are somehow removed from an area (like wildfire?)--native lupines are another example. They are nitrogen-fixers--they are there for a few years, then other plants move in. Perhaps because mine went into a cleared-out area, it had success. It wasn't anything I did intentionally.

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  6. Ha ha, you have been a "real" gardener for as long as I have been reading your blog - and, of course, much longerr. That Kalanchloe is so subtly beautiful.

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    1. You are very kind!

      The Kalanchloe has the special quality of looking great on a nasty hot day when everything else looks droopy and bleached out.

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  7. Want to see some gymnastics coming up with names for colors? Read a paint color fan sometime. I love all these coppery tones, whatever you call them.

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    1. Someone's job is to think up paint color names. Can you imagine?

      "So, what do you do for a living?"
      "I think up names for paint colors!"

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  8. Love that Woolly Blue Curls so much. Kept one alive in a too-small pot, gave it to a friend to put in the ground -- now I want to try another one in a much bigger pot. And oh, how I love that (coppery!) 'Vera Higgins.' Survived the New Year's snow without a hitch... the only problem with it is that the White-crowned Sparrows think it's delicious. They'll be leaving for the north soon, so I let them eat away...

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    1. Maybe the sparrows are thirsty? I was hand-watering a rose this morning with the hose and a hummingbird came and drank out of the stream. It's going to be a grim summer.

      One site said if you deadhead WBC promptly it blooms for quite a long stretch--must do that...

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