It's Okay, Because It Will Never Need Water

I went to the local garden show this morning.  I didn't take photos.  There were just a few demonstration gardens, which were all quite nice--basically a small patio with stylish mid-century-modern-ishy furniture, a screen of horizontal wood, the suggestion of a pergola, and some succulent plants.  Throw pillows for color.  They were all tastefully done.   I liked them. 
Who needs this, when there are throw pillows?
 The seminars were almost all about cooking and furniture.  Nothing for me, there.

There were a third of the number of plant sellers of a couple of years ago, and a quarter of what there was in the show's heyday of '05-'07.  Which is just as well, because of the drought.  

I bought an Aloe dhufarensis, which is native to the southern part of the Arabian peninsula.  It loves heat, and wants no water at all.  Perfect for the drought.  
Less than perfect:

I lurch between despair and confidence about the water situation. Our normal summer/fall irrigation schedule was three times per week, and every other day when temperatures went over and stayed above 90F.  We are instructed to cut our use by 36%, so our irrigation schedule will drop to twice per week, a cut of 33%.  

A local garden center gave away pepper plants for Earth Day:
I think our "navy" showers and irrigation tweaks will save at least another 3%, so there is our 36%, theoretically.  I'll spot-water anything that looks desperate. Today it is I who feels a little desperate.  



Comments

  1. So tough. Everybody is supposed to cut 36%? What if you were already water-wise before? 36% might be really difficult to come by.

    I hope something changes before things get really critical. (Love the last photo btw!)

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    1. No, the cuts were made according to how "wasteful" a district is. 36% was the highest cut. Hence, desperation.

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  2. I'm guessing that we attended the same spring garden show today. I was disappointed - and sad - to see that many of my favorite vendors, like Geraniaceae, weren't there, although I still managed to pick up 3 plants, including a 'Joe Hoak' (even though Denise gave me a seedling, I couldn't pass up a $15 specimen in a gallon container). It could have been worse I suppose - at least the cemetery that sponsored a display garden 2 years ago hasn't returned. In any case, I consoled myself with a trip to Rogers...

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    Replies
    1. Sorry to have missed you! I would have recognized the white fluffy skirt and white gloves--- ;^)

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  3. Annie would tell you that you're not the problem, but I guess you probably already realize that:
    https://blog.anniesannuals.com/2015/04/23/home-gardeners-are-not-the-problem/#comments

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    Replies
    1. That's the thing! We're not the problem, but it has been decided we must be 95% of the solution.

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  4. 36% is a lot indeed. At least that Aloe is one less thing to worry about.

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    1. The Arabian peninsula Aloes are quite interesting--their leaf surface has a fine silvery sheen, perhaps to get them through those 120F temperatures. (I have to think about this, not about water).

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  5. That's a mighty spiffy Aloe...kinda makes me thirsty, though.

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  6. That aloe is a great find. Rare and beautiful. I'm still looking for one

    I love how much you care about the water situation, the environment. If everyone were like you, we wouldn't have a problem.

    I know it's tough, but we're all in the same boat, and we'll get through this together.

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  7. That species is a real heat lover, so I'll have to give it an especially hot and arid spot. I worry about it surviving next winter's plentiful and record-setting rains. ;^)

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  8. I was going to post Annie's link for you, but Loree beat me to it. It's a good one, and should make you feel a little rebellious, if you weren't already. It is so massively screwed up that residential users are the ones that are under restriction, whereas agro-biz and fracking can keep going as if nothing happened, and media seems to have lost any integrity and quest to expose the truth they ever had. I guess informing people and calling politicians out on their fallacies is up to us gardeners. So, stand your ground, and keep your garden alive. As Annie points out - you are doing a good thing for the environment!

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