Brief Succulent Tapestry Meditation

I posted this yesterday, but didn't comment upon it.  The above photo was from a visit to Roger's in Corona del Mar yesterday.   They've been tweaking and adding to it over the past few weeks.

I count twelve Echeveria subridgidas, eleven 'Evening Glow' Echeverias, seven Echeveria agavoides, five 'Karas Choice' Agaves, twenty two Aloe juvenna,  four Agave...'Burnt Burgundy', is it?  Add up how much that would cost, even wholesale.   And this is just one bit of the planting bed.  A spectacular succulent tapestry, well designed, requires a big budget or a few years of serious focused propagation.  You don't even want to know how much those gorgeous polished stone pieces cost (they are trickle fountains).  The river rocks are cheap, at least.

Guess I'd better start propagating a little less casually.

Update.  I found a few more photos that Beloved took almost exactly a month ago with his little point-and-shoot.  Two Agaves added since then, where the red Xs are...
A bit more of it shows here...

Here's the area on the far end.  Nice Agave guiengola 'Creme Brulee' there.

Comments

  1. Thanks for the explanation. I wondered about it when I saw it last night. That rock the fountains are made of is very beautiful.

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  2. Yes, that's what happens when you stop gazing meditation and start thinking! The fatal transition from Sunday night to Monday morning...

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    1. A time to think, a time to vegetate. ;^)

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  3. A very beautiful garden with interesting textures, colours and design elements.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. It's pretty cool, isn't it? Glad you liked it.

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  4. I thought the planting looked denser when I saw your photo but I assumed it was a trick of memory, or that the plants had simply fleshed out. I went back just now and checked by photos from February and, indeed, there have been updates. I don't usually like arrangements this formally designed but this one is an exception.

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    1. I found some older photos, but I think when I first saw it there were less plants--they must have been working on it and had to order more plants to finish it off. It's pretty cool considering they have a lot of different elements. Some nice big Aloe rubroviolaceaeas on the other side. Didn't get a shot--often one part is in deep shade and another in bright sun--plus people milling around..hard to get good photos.

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  5. This has got to be the nicest succulent tapestry I've ever seen. So often they disintegrate as the plants grow (or die), but this planting seems to be kept up meticulously. I would never have the time (or desire) to attempt something like this in my own garden.

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    1. They started in in January and it will probably be all changed to something else by September, or even July. They did a great job. It's not my style either--but I wish it was!

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