Monday, January 25, 2016

I Don't Know About This

 Rusty corrugated scrap metal fashioned into columns.  Not that they are not spiffy, (they are) but do they reflect the local vibe, where the median price of a home is $2.2 million?

Vertical column planters, and a trough, each priced at nearly $300.  The columns were over $800. 
The prices, yes, capture the vibe, but the style?  This I don't know.  

And then there is the magnetically levitating bonsai...

26 comments:

  1. I really like the corrugated metal look BUT I think it only works in very specific situations. I don't think it would work in my garden, or in yours.

    I saw the levitating bonsai thingie and found it fascinating. I want a much larger device with a floating agave!

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    1. Seems more Portland than Newport Beach, but that's just me?

      If we ever get some El Nino rain, we may have floating Agaves without the device.

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  2. I guess the rusted look is 'trendy' in some gardens but they don't appeal to me.
    The Air Bonsai video would not stream properly for me but what I did see was fascinating.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. Have to have the right house for that rusty scrap metal style, don't you think?

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  3. Kind of depends on where the 2mil home is..here we have faux farmhouses in that price range and up that would be quite suitable !

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    1. Quit rubbing it in that you live in Napa. Just stop it already! ;^)

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  4. If this were some gardener's own creation, I would say Well Done. As a high end item? Meh.

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  5. The form is quite nice, but the finish... well, it probably has its place, but i agree: not in a million-dollar neighborhood.

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  6. Might not work in that neighborhood but I think it would look good in mine. Filing away that idea ...

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    1. I think they are really cool. If I had the style of house that worked with that, I'd want them (not at those prices).

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    2. Yeah, my husband makes things out of stuff he finds for cheap or free, so I was thinking more along those lines. :) After seeing this post, we were talking about using this type of metal as a mold for a hypertufa pot with a columnar look.

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    3. Handy husband! I was thinking it could make a mold of some sort also--that would be a fun experiment.

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    4. If it ever happens, I'll send you a pic.

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  7. Um...probably not in newport, unless they made if themselves. Weird how prices vs. style vs. location intersect to give you a sense of place.

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    1. Yes, a sense of place. Says "Portland" or "Austin" to me, not Corona del Mar.

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  8. I guess I was the only one who was a bit disconcerted by the levitating bonsai. The spinning, in particular, created some cognitive dissonance.

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    1. Maybe the spin was to ensure the plant gets even light? ;^)

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  9. I like rusty metal things but I wouldn't expect to pay those prices for the effect. As for the magnetically levitating bonsai, I'm not sure I understand the attraction - a fishing line fixed to the ceiling would create much the same effect. I'll have to consult my resident scientist for an explanation of how it works (which may make it more impressive - or not).

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    1. Isn't it lovely to have a resident scientist? (In my case a resident engineer.) We are lucky, aren't we?

      Some sort of electro-magnetic effect being used. The electricity required being silly in comparison to the cost of a piece of fishing line.

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  10. I already have rusty tin in my landscape, primarily raised beds and privacy fence. I would like to paste some images here, but cannot. Maybe I should add a post on the blog. I do however like the design of the column.

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    1. The column is cool, yes. Would like to see that post, please do! Blogs are so handy for stuff like that. ;^)

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  11. I guess if you could afford a 2.2 million dollar home, you probably afford something more appropriate. I like these, but they would be a better fit for rural shabby chic type of house and garden. West of here out in the country is a mother lode of rusty corrugated metal.

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    1. Yes, shabby-chic or urban homesteader type of thing. Rusty metal in a few decades will rejoin the earth--plastic discards take centuries, if ever. :(

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Always interested in your thoughts.

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