Monday, March 14, 2016

Pre-Bloom Day

Above, Hunnemannia fumariifolia, Mexican Tulip Poppy.  

Too many flowers for one Bloom Day post.  Tomorrow is mostly dedicated to Leucospermum 'Yellow Bird'.  Today...
'Honey Perfume'
'Lady Emma Hamilton'
 'Wildfire'
 Grevillea 'Austraflora Fanfare'
Grevillea 'Peaches and Cream'
 Grevillea 'Moonlight'
 
Graptoveria 'Fred Ives'
 
 Five different flowers:  Leucadendron linifolium, Eschscholzia californica, Aloe 'Blue Elf', Limonium perezii, and far in the background, tomorrow's Leucospermum.

 Agave 'Blue Glow' with Metrosideros 'Spring Fire' in the background.
  Tall!
'Brass Band' buds
 These "Dutch" Iris won't be open for tomorrow's Bloom Day, and they'll be long gone by April.
 'Rose Rhapsody'
Usually always the earliest Clematis, 'Bourbon'
 Is a Fig a flower?  Structurally, it's a hollow-ended stem.  The flowers are inside!
 Pre-Bloom Day feels like Spring!
 This winter's rainfall has been disappointing, but the plants are happy, which makes the gardener happy.  Tomorrow, flowers!

22 comments:

  1. It looks incredible Hoov. You've made an excellent choice of plants and combined them with style. I shall be struggling for one post of blooms, let alone two!

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    1. I have to say that many gardeners in So Cal would be enthralled by photos of puddles, pouring rain, and mud, beautiful, beautiful mud.

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  2. Glorious flowers dear Hoover,such beautiful colours, I love them all, especially the roses, they are superb. You must be very happy with the rewards from your tender care in the garden.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. Thank you, kind Dianne. It is a surprise how well the roses are doing. I feel very fortunate.

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  3. So many blooms! I really love the "five flowers" photo. Such a nice grouping! :)

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    1. Thanks! Way more in the garden than in the post: I got tired of taking pictures after a while.

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  4. Wow, so much in bloom in your garden! The variety of plants you have continues to amaze me.

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    1. Lack of focus has one virture--lots of floral variety!

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  5. You have an embarrassment of riches! I have a few blooms, but just getting photos of them in the rain will be the biggest challenge.

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    1. Rain? That is what I call "an embarrassment of riches". If you get tired of the rain, think of all the gardeners in Southern California who are extremely envious.

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  6. Spring is in high gear in your garden! The sight of the Metrosideros had me sighing again but yours does look very tall. If the tree/foliage-hater up the street ever moves out, maybe...I'm also coveting Leucadendron linifolium but as I haven't identified the right sunny spot for it (yet).

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    1. The Metrosideros is about 8' tall, still shorter than your house. It's not full grown by far, though. L. galpinii might be more upright...not sure, but maybe. L. linifolium is fabulous in flower arrangements. :)

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  7. Is that ocotillo beyond your agave?!?! Love ocotillo! And what fig are you growing? Again, love your pictures. Beautiful!

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    1. Glad you liked the pictures. Thanks!

      That plant is Alluaudia procera, which does have the common name "Madagascar Ocotillo", but it's not an Ocotillo, and the two genera are not closely related. Not sure about growing Ocotillo in my neighborhood; it may not be hot enough here for it. It is a fabulous plant.

      The fig is "Brown Turkey". The fruit is delicious if we can get to it before the squirrels and birds.

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  8. Wonderful photos all, but especially love the hunnemania and 'Fred Ives.' I just don't remember my FI blooming as elegantly as yours!

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    1. Thank you, Denise! 'Fred' took over that corner and loves that spot--in other parts of the garden he's not so lavish. I highly, highly recommend the Hunnemannia as a filler here and there. Fabulous plant.

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  9. I covet your Grevillea, or more accurately the climate in which to grow it.

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    1. They are sort of our (dry climate, full sun) equivalent of a repeat-blooming Hydrangea, mostly big rounded shrubs with spectacular flowers that needs little care besides dead-heading, with an added bonus Hydrangea cannot offer, feeding bees and hummingbirds.

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  10. Beautiful! So many beautiful flowers. It looks like spring (if not summer!) in your garden. Happy early bloom day!

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    1. A surprise how well everything is doing. Happy GBBD back at you, pre- and otherwise!

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  11. I, too, was thinking "embarrassment of riches"...while fighting off attacks by the green-eyed monster.

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    1. I think the same thing when considering your region's annual rainfall. Sigh.

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