How Are The Grevilleas Doing?





Above G. lanigera 'Mt. Tamboritha', below G. lanigera 'Coastal Gem'.  The two plants are similar.  'Coastal Gem' has slightly finer, narrower foliage and flatter growth habit;  'Tamboritha' has larger flowers.  This 'Coastal Gem' has several years growth advantage over the 'Tamboritha' and is slowly engulfing the Adenanthos cuneata next to it. 



Speaking of Adenanthos, last years new plant has grown considerably. 
 'Robyn Gordon', growing well if slightly chlorotic.
 'Superb' #1:
 Big 'Moonlight', growing strong:
 I am guessing our long stretch of cool overcast weather helped to induce chlorosis.  The soil has plenty of iron.
 'Fanfare' has grown and bloomed.  The first one was small and died in a heat wave last year.  This one purchased as a somewhat larger plant has had no problems with the heat.  What a beauty.
 'Superb' #2 and #3
Hey where's 'Peaches and Cream', the best of the best?  
Dandy. 
 

Comments

  1. I know a fair few gardeners out my way who are very intimidated by Australasians in general, and I'm going to start linking them here and to other posts about your grevillea because they really look terrific--thick, lush, and unruly--which they rarely do when people start playing fast and loose with irrigation in the warmer months.

    I don't think I remember seeing your adenanthos before. I got mine a few years ago from Parkside in Riverside, if I remember correctly, and it took about a year to grow out of its legginess (the partial shade situation it's in might be responsible for that). Can't entirely tell from some of these shots, but it's pretty forgiving of tight spaces, competition, and shallow soil. Very interested to see yours after summer's over.

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    1. I'm hitting the need for acidic soil on some of them (chlorotic), though Moonlight had that problem at first and now it doesn't. Over did it on soil sulphur with the blueberries, so proceeding cautiously with that. Several places say regular water the first two years, so that's what they are getting. Since this garden is on a hill with silt not clay, it's worked out.

      I saw the same Adenanthos at least a decade ago that Kris Late To Garden Party saw, the one that was at the Long Beach Aquarium, 8' tall, absolutely spectacular, and had to have it--don't think that specimen is there anymore. They need water as far as I can tell--killed my first with not enough.

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    2. Interesting you saw it at the Aquarium. My youngest used to be a docent there around that time and I don't remember noticing the plantings. But...Jo O'Connell/Aus Native Plants in Ojai told me that the Aquarium has been a long-time customer of hers, that she's even ferried plants down here for them. small world....

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    3. Seems to me I took a photo of the Aquarium Adenanthos with the family posed in front of it--I'll have to look for it. The plant was glorious.

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  2. You've got some beauties there and it's nice to see them doing so well in the ground!

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    1. They grow in pots?!? Ah, climate...

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  3. Ah man...so lovely. You know I'm green with envy.

    So in photo 'Superb' #1 there's a green sort of cone shaped thing to the right...what the heck is it?

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    1. Hey what you talking about?!? I think you have as many Grevilleas as I. Green with envy at least means you're not chlorotic. ;^) Sorry that yellow foliage is bugging me a lot.

      Ah! Yes that plant does look strange. The cone shaped thing is an Aloe seedling that has not yet begun to spiral and become a rosette, so at that angle it looks like a cone. Aloe striata. I never even noticed it in the photo.

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  4. Very timely report. Was just noting that I let Mt. Tam get swamped by ornamental oregano, so it's a goner. If the chlorosis isn't too injurious, I kind of like the pale leaf! But I suppose photosynthesis is less optimal or some such. I think I prefer Moonlight over Peaches & Cream. I saw a gorgeous 'Red Hooks' in San Diego, a toothbrush grevillea, but it gets big. I think I saw it for sale local too, maybe Village in Huntington Beach.

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    1. Sorry to hear you lost Mt Tam. Didn't realize ornamental oregano could be that vigorous.

      The Chlorosis if that is what it is--only worried it will weaken the plant. With this heat the soil will warm up fast, so we'll see if that cures the yellow.

      The 'Fanfare' has toothbrush flowers, very rich red ones.

      I am preferring 'Peaches & Cream'--when we open our gate, there it is, framed and just perfect. Naturally rounded shape where 'Moonlight' is a little awkward. 'Moonlight' however is more grand and imposing and it is gracefully tossed by the afternoon sea breeze, so nice among the static tree aloes.

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  5. Most of my Grevillea have that touch of yellow foliage color too. Hopefully, they'll all green up. Your Adenanthos looks SO much better than mine (A. sericeus). It wasn't looking good before the heatwave but it looks almost gray now with just some splashes of new green growth. I'm not digging it up now (as it will only encourage the raccoons to forage in that area) but I expect I'm going to replace it in the fall.

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    1. Watering it? Mine gets modest but frequent water.

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  6. They are a lovely lot aren't they? Glad to see them doing well for you!!

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    1. I wasn't sure they would grow here, but so far excellent results, and yet another genus to feed the bees and for hummingbirds to fight about.

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