Thursday, July 7, 2016

New Plants, New Pots

Just a few.  It's summer, not a good time for plant purchases.  A 4" Annie's Annuals copy of Glaucium flavum aurantiacum.  Some members of the genus are classified as noxious weeds in certain areas.  A few plants cross the line from weed to ornamental--others go the opposite direction. 


 Fuzzy felty foliage, silky summer blossoms. 
 Our sole plant purchase from the Huntington CSS show was Kalanchoe bracteata 'Silvermint'.  We went Sunday and the sale was shopped out.  Not an Echinopsis to be had. 
Two pots from the show, one a Peety Pot for Rhombophyllum species uncertain...nellii(?), which was ready for a larger home.  It bloomed in thanks. 


 One for the Bursera, from a vendors table that was just about empty.  What treasures did I miss, when this beauty was the leftover?   
 A show last year produced the pot for Euphorbia suzannae. 
Still looks good.  

Not a lot of gardening being done--threw out the dead Leucodendron 'Pisa' and near dead Acacia 'Cousin Itt'.  Both root systems implied not enough water.  Otherwise still cleaning out closets and drawers, a good activity for hot days.  One drawer yielded the Felco blade-sharpener I've been looking for since last year.  That's something. 

16 comments:

  1. Love that Glaucium -- how can it be a weed? Sounds like it's a year late, but that Euphorbia suzannae is so great, and perfectly matched to the pot you chose!

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    1. Well, if it reseeds like crazy, I guess.

      Isn't that suzannae cute? I've had it for years and it hasn't grown a millimeter. I'd guess it was plastic, but it isn't.

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  2. I'm loving the organic look and texture of all those pots!

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    1. Quite a few people making really cool pots these days. I'm happy to support the craft.

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  3. Hello...what pretty little treasures! Do you know anything about euphorbia leuconeura? I have one about 3 feet tall and it has a shoot growing off it near the bottom part of the stem. Have you ever tried cutting it off and rooting it in water? I've looked online but can't seem to find anything except about seeding and air layering.

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    1. A lot of Euphorbs are easy to root from cuttings, so you might try that. Remember the sap is caustic so wear safety googles or glasses for eye protection as well as gloves to protect your skin. Good tips here:

      http://www.euphorbia-international.org/euphorbias/cultivation/about_euph_cultivation_propagation.htm

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  4. I wish my Glaucium grandiflorum was weedier -- not a seedling so far. That CSSA show seems to get smaller and smaller at the Huntington, but there was still lots of tempting stuff on Saturday. I just brought home an Agave colorata and Euphorbia multifolia. I saw the latter in the show and raced back to see if the one for sale was still available on the sales tables, and it was! And, wow, is Pasadena hotter than home, by at least 20 degrees.

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    1. The show did seem smaller, although there were still some thrillers. A. colorata is such a beauty! Love that one.

      Surely winter rains will bring forth some grandiflorum seedlings?

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  5. I purchased 3 of the same Glaucium by mail order a couple of weeks prior to our hideous heatwave. There's no sign of flowers but I'm happy that the plants survived the event without any damage. I'm glad your trip to the Huntington yielded some beautiful pots - I guess the relatively cool weather must have brought out hoards of people on Saturday if the succulent choices had been thinned that much.

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    1. We'll have to compare notes on the Glaucium in a year or so. Nifty plant, eh?

      Most of the tables were half empty--a few were empty. I asked the cashiers about it and they said they'd been totally mobbed both Friday and Saturday.

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  6. On the bright side, how cool is it that people are appreciating these plants. You still managed to score, even if the browsing might not have been as absorbing as you'd hoped. That pot is stunning.

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    1. Actually not complaining--I have too many plants as it is!

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  7. Glad I didn't drive out to Huntington, since the only day I could have gone was Sunday. It'd be nice to have real-time blogging, so I can see what's left before I make the trek!

    Sorry Cousin Itt didn't make it. I've resigned myself to enjoying him in photos. Or other people's gardens, although I've yet to see a good looking one for reals.

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    1. Well, the show was fun, and there's lots of other stuff there to enjoy. We had a great time. The Lotus were awesome.

      It appears that Grevillea nudiflora 'Medusa' will (for my purposes) be a perfectly acceptable substitute for 'Cousin Itt', with the addition of hummingbird-attracting flowers. So--onward to new plant adventures! :)

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  8. I've fallen in love with glauciums but they don't seem to love me back. The one I bought last year died. This year's trial specimen is still alive but is stagnant at best. I thought they liked full sun??? I won't give up...

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    1. From what I've read they are mostly sea-coastal, implying plenty of sun and sharp drainage but more moderate temperatures. That is my uneducated guess. How mine does placed in a relatively hot spot next to concrete--wasn't sure about that. But that spot is nothing compared to your summer temps!

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