Thursday, August 11, 2016

Bunny

What you lookin' at, bunn-head?   There is no lawn to destroy in this garden.  I've put up wire fencing to keep you from eating the Gomphrena...
...you don't bother the Alluaudia at all...
 Or Aloe flowers...
'Rooikappie':

...or daylillies...
 You ignore dainty Echeverias...thank you!
 ...you've sampled and rejected the Agaves...
 ...the black Lagerstroemia remains untouched...
 Bunny I am glad you dislike this!
 The neighbor's delicious lawn is waiting.  
   Hop over there.

17 comments:

  1. Bunnies! That's pretty special, at least it would be here. But like you, I'd rather have the bunny eat next door :-).

    That black crape myrtle is pretty special! What's the cultivar name?

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    1. That is Lagerstroemia 'Ebony Embers', commercially sold under the copywrite name Lagerstroemia 'Black Diamond Red Hot'. Awaiting the pure brilliant crimson flowers on that baby.

      The black-foliaged Lagerstroemias were developed by USDA horticulturalist Cecil Pounders (my hero!); they are not patented and may be grown and sold by anyone. I think a good alternative to the purple-foliaged ornamental plums which do very poorly here. I bought another one this year because I'm so enthralled by the first one.

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    2. At least I think they are not patented.
      See: http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/48/12/1568.full for interesting information on this plant.

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  2. Very very clever of you and outstanding photos, too

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  3. I think I have an idea. I will download all your spiky pictures, print them off and pin them up all around our boundary.

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  4. So good you have no lawn and delicious plants as food for the bunnies. Sigh......last night I saw 6!! bunnies on the lawn, I ran outside and clapped my hands after which they disappeared in the borders (o no!) and to their den in the compostheap...... I´m sure they will be back. I cannot destroy them for they look so cute...., but my garden will change.

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    1. Here the coyotes control their numbers. Usually by this time of the year there are very few survivors. The rabbit's fur is very beautiful, that mix of brown, black, gold--what wonderful colors!

      Six bunnies! That is a lot of lawn--it must grow fast, to keep up with the bunnies!

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  5. I'm surprised the bunny ignores the daylilies - I'd have thought they'd consider that dessert! There are bunnies in the general area here but I've yet to see one in my garden. I suppose the coyotes keep them (and the peacocks) at bay here but, if so, why don't they control the squirrels?

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    1. The squirrels appear to be as wily as the coyotes, unfortunately.

      There is a bit of fescue invading the Dymondia out front. I know the bunnies are eating that grass, for which I am mostly grateful as it's a bear to pull because the dymondia is so tight. They can't eat the grass down to the roots, unfortunately. @#^#$& grass would never grow when it had the space all to itself, Grrrr!

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  6. I haven’t got bunnies here, I have squirrels instead and oh boy are they making a lot of damage – it’s mayhem waiting for me every day when I come out in the garden and I never really know what’s in store for me. These days they have worked up and appetite for carnations and gerberas and they eat every single flower just before they are about to flower. Last month it was lily flowers on the menu. And of course they eat apples. One bite of each apple and then they bury the rest of it in my pots. Only problem is that the apples are almost ready for harvest now so trying to bury those HUGE apples in my pots and containers create a lots of mess and damaged plants. Maybe you could send me some coyotes??

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    1. I think I should send you a few--the squirrels here have vanished, and are not missed.

      Sorry to hear of damage to the beautiful garden you have planned and worked so hard on. Hope some squirrel-eliminating creature takes care of the fluffy rats.

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  7. Fab photos as always, AND you named a mystery plant for me - the Alluaudia. Saw one this past spring, and have since then wondered what it was. Thank you for that! I scared up a bunny in my garden the other week, but haven't found anything particularly damaged yet. It probably liked it better at the next lot over, because I haven't seen it since! :)

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    1. I never feel hurt when they choose someone else's garden. Thankfully you got no damage.

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  8. I've only seen one rabbit in all of our time living here, I wonder why? (not complaining)

    The yellow foliage behind the A.'Rooikappie' flower really sets it off nicely. Is that a Grevillea? And is the yellow normal?

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    1. Why? Extreme good luck?

      The yellow foliage on Grevillea 'Superb' is chlorosis, which I've been working on with soil sulfur and acidified water. One plant is completely recovered, two more yet to cure...so no, not normal. :( But it does set off 'Rooikappie'. :)

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