Thursday, November 10, 2016

Foliage

 Aloe dhufarensis, above, has grown considerably.  Native to Oman, on the southeast of the Arabian peninsula, it prefers fierce heat and little moisture.  Though my garden cannot provide Omani temperatures, reflected heat from nearby concrete seems to satisfy this Aloe.  Should we ever get a rainy winter, protection from rain may be necessary.   I've watered this plant once or twice since purchase back in April 2015, plus it received around nine inches of rainfall since then.  Not much!

Here it is a year ago, much smaller, at the bottom of the red circle: 

Wow, a lot of growth on all the plants in just one drought year!
 Aloe microstigma, long suffering on the same front slope, recently got its own irrigation dripper.  It improved in health immediately, greening up and growing new leaves.  Despite a reputation for preferring extreme dryness, the dryness of the front slope is--beyond dry.  Aloe microstigma needs more water here than Aloe dhufarensis. 
 Native to the far different climate of New Zealand, lovely Hebe foliage seen recently in Santa Cruz.  The new foliage, lighter than the mature, creates a contrasting effect of considerable charm.

 And Agave marmorata, always a favorite in color, texture, and architecture. 

8 comments:

  1. Purty foliage. Despite your garden's lack of Omani temperatures, Aloe dhufarensis seems quite happy.

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    1. In your luxuriously rainy climate, it might survive on your dry sense of humor. ;)

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  2. "Beyond dry" - I have similar concerns with my own front slope, now that I've gotten down to planting a new section. The water sheets right off the soil. Drip may be the answer for me too. Mulch helped some in other sections.

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    1. I'm pro-drip and very pro-mulch. Here, they work. In the flats in adobe clay, maybe not, but this garden is not in the flats in adobe clay.

      Enjoy planting you slope! Looking forward to see what you do with it.

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  3. If I hadn't already fallen in love with Hebes recently, your photos would have clinched the deal.

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    1. Beautiful genus! They are not wildly happy here--much happier in your climate, or in Santa Cruz.

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  4. I'm still obsessed with Aloe dhufarensis. I got a small (very small) one from Arid Lands last winter, planted it in the succulent mound in the front yard and then promptly stepped on it. I thought it was toast but it's still alive. But being crushed didn't exactly help with its development. Still, it doesn't seem to be a fast grower, at least not for me. But I'm being patient.

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    1. I thought dhufy would be fussy, but it has been quite the opposite. A. pseudorubroviolacea is also from the Arabian peninsula and that one has also been very successful. Could be that a heavily rainy winter would kill them both, but...a "heavily rainy winter" sounds so good, ya know?

      I stepped on one of my Agave victoriae-reginaes pretty good. It happens.

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