Winter Project 2017 Complete (For Now)

Leucospermum 'Tango' on the left?  Or...
...on the right?  
 I went with the location on the right, where there is more space.
The anxiety-inducing part was moving the Leucospermum 'High Gold'.  It is not yet well established, as I only planted it this past spring, but moving Proteaceae can be iffy.    I moved it Thursday because Friday was predicted to bring heavy rain, with several days of cool cloudy weather after that.  No hot sun to increase stress.  

The spot I originally gave 'High Gold' was too small:
About six feet to the right... 

Plenty of space now.  The Agave 'Blue Flame' to the left of 'High Gold' will be moved if the Leucospermum survives.  
Please don't die, gorgeous!
 Aloe suzannae gets 'High Gold's spot.  The Aloe was in very poor condition when I got it, or rather it went south immediately (the very next day) after I got it, but it seems better after spending the summer on the hot dry slope. It has new leaves that are nice and healthy despite all the rain.  The soil is extremely fast-draining in this area.  
Please don't die, gorgeous!
 So there we go.  Leucospermum 'High Gold' replaced Leucadendron linifolium,  Leucadendron 'Wilsons Wonder' and Leucospermum 'Tango' replaced the trio of Calothamnus villosus, and a third Aloe 'Fire Ranch' was removed, because two 'Fire Ranch' are plenty. 
 One 'Fire Ranch is here:
 The other is close to Aloe marlothii, but I think they'll be okay.  The angle of the photo makes them look closer than they really are.  I will remove the 'Fire Ranch' if it becomes a problem.  This photo also shows there is some planting space still available even when the shrubs grow.   
'Wilsons Wonder' is flowering.  The inflorescence is a yellow cone of flowers.
I plan to move as many green-foliaged plants from the left side of the slope to this area as will fit (Agave victoriae-reginae, Aloe tweediceae, the green dwarf Agave titanota, etc), so that blue/silver foliage will dominate on the left hand side of the slope, while the right hand side will be more in the green/gold color range.   
Click on this photo to expand it:
The area still needs mulch and some minor irrigation modifications, but that must wait until the rain is over.  I declare this project finished, at least until its time to work on it again. 

Comments

  1. Congratulations on finishing (for now)! The wide shot is great - your color choices really show up. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  2. Your slope looks fantastic. That last photo was really helpful to get an overall impression of it. I guess, you have chosen the perfect timing to move 'High Gold' with the rain and the cloudy skies in the forecast. Hope it will survive the transplant, but I think its chances are good.
    That light gray blue agave to the left is such an eye catcher, totally stunning!
    Wishing you a lovely Sunday!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. I was waiting, waiting until rain was imminent. 'High Gold' is looking perky so far, even the new growth.

      That is A. titanota I think you refer to. It really stands out, doesn't it. A photo often helps in the design process. Provides a different perspective. (Not that I have a design process.)

      Have a great holiday!

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  3. Helloooo HB !
    I am intrigued with yur plants and your "planting" scheme ... I think it is working out beautifully !
    I have to say I am in love with agave Blue Flame ... I am so drawn to that ghostly colour as a contrast to the other plants .. but what an amazing selection you have ... well done !
    Joy
    PS .. still laughing AT "Agent Orange" ! LOL

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    1. Thanks! The planting was sort of anti-climax because it took 10 minutes. The removal took days. 'Blue Flame' is a beauty.

      Garden on! :)

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  4. Gorgeous (don't die!). How wonderful that you planted and moved everything AND still have a little space to play with...

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    1. Those Calothamnus were bigger than I thought!

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  5. SO MUCH WORK!!! Congrats on finishing it up. I can't imagine taking out one of those huge shrubs, much less 2. My fingers are crossed that everyone survives in their new spots. I think I'd have a heart attack right along with you if you lost that beautiful 'High Gold'!

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    1. This from the person who removed a huge deep-rooted lawn, planted hundreds of new beautiful plants, endures an insensitive neighbor, and added how many tons of rock to her garden?

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  6. Crossing my fingers for your gorgeous plants! The photo of the whole slope looks incredible and is very helpful.

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    1. Thanks, Evan. I won't accidentally delete your comment this time. 'High Gold' looks okay so far. The more I look at that photo, the more I think the slope needs some rearranging.

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  7. Wow your garden is a feast to my eyes Hoover Boo.
    Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Thank you Marijke. I think spring is coming to your area soon? All the bulbs to bloom, and the fresh new leaves to emerge...enjoy!

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  8. Looking good Hoov. Hope all's well after the 'weather bomb', as it is being described here.

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    1. The storm wasn't all that bad. We've been in a drought so long people seem to have forgotten what a historically average "winter" here is like. (I put quotes around "winter", because as one of Dear Husband's co-workers, who was visiting from the UK, told him: "Your winter is our summer.")

      The soil here is now fairly moist, and we're not in a heat wave. That's as good as it gets!

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  9. Your finished project looks absolutely incredible! It has such flow and rhythm....I love hearing about your decision making w/ it and seeing how it plays out. Such a dynamic garden. -holly

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    1. Happy you found something of interest in my garden projects. Experimenting is a form of education.

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  10. Fingers crossed on High Gold. I've got a couple buds on mine, so we'll see if it doesn't drown before they open. I always keep in mind your tepid enthusiasm for 'Fire Ranch.' I saw it at a nursery recently and had to back away, even though the leaves were gorgeous enough, all winter red. No room for iffy aloes here.

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    1. I was just at Rogers' and their 'Fire Ranch' looked surprisingly good in the parking lot, mixed in with Leucadenron 'Jester', Sedum 'Coppertone', and a couple other things. Maybe what it needs is a good rainy year. The first 'High Gold' flower is opening despite the move. Won't really know if it will be okay until the first heat wave hits, hopefully not until July.

      I can save you a rooted stem of 'Fire Ranch' if you like. I've got plenty.

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  11. I really need to follow your shining example and rearrange things this year...but I say that every year. Your hard work is really paying off.

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    1. The first good rainy season since the beginning of 2012 has been an enormous motivation. I doubt we've had this much rain since the winter of '96-'97

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