Lawn Removal Update

Before:
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This morning:
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It doesn't look like much yet, but I'm still thrilled to be rid of that #%$^ lawn. Taking the time to make the flag stones flat and level, instead of letting them slope with the slope, was so worth the extra effort. Now I can comfortably stand or kneel to work, and walking up the flag stones is like walking up an easy stairway. Wow! I did something right!

Most of the new plants are moved from elsewhere in the garden: a couple of santolina plantlings, a day lily formerly in too much shade, two dozen clumps of Dymondia, and a desperate Chamelaucium from the arid front slope, which was too dry for it, and which will need to be moved after it recovers. New plants are three new sweeeeet dwarf lavenders, and two new roses, both 'Young Lycidas'. Yes, I know. I got weak and could not resist. It happens (a lot).

Santolina rootling:
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Dymondia patch:
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Hospitalized Chamelaucium:
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'Young Lycidas'. Not much chance for a beauty shot from my camera with that color rose. All I can say so far is: good fragrance. The stones forming a little retaining wall of sorts were what I had to dig out to plant the rose.
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And the other one up the slope:
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There's an empty spot waiting for a rose I have in the back in excessive shade. That rose has a lot of new growth despite all the shade, so I'm waiting for the soft growth to harden before I move the plant to this spot:
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There's another empty area perfect for a smaller rose where I pulled out a done-for Madeira geranium. One of my rooted cuttings (whichever one survives) will go in there in the fall.

Future rooted cutting site:
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Romulan Ale for plants:
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Though it doesn't look like much now, when the pair of 'Young Lycidas' grow, and the Dymondia fills in, it should be an improvement over that sorry lawn. Given a few extra gallons of rain water collected from our late May storms, and a couple of gallons of that Romulan Ale of fertilizers, the formerly sad standard rose is now a billowing mass of flowers feeding hundreds of happy bees. So glad I didn't dig it out...

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Comments

  1. Your yard make-over looks fantastic! It is amazing how much the standard tree rose has recovered under your loving care. I have heard many good things about 'Young Lycidas' and I am curious to see how it is doing in your garden. When all the plants will fill in this part of your garden will look even more stunning. Job well done!
    Christina

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  2. Oh, I'm with you, sister - grass must go! It may not look like much yet but I see the effort involved.

    Glad you IDd that standard rose: Looking at the pic, I was thinking, "Is that a crape myrtle?" It's HUGE! No wonder the bees are happy. As, apparently, are you! Just what's in that Romulan Ale, anyway?

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  3. What a great idea for a renovation and nicely done. That Young Lycidas is a real bloomer - or is it the gardener? Beautiful, Hoovb.

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  4. way to sack your !@#*^(@!*(lawn!! the flagstones look great and that flowering tree is amazing! it will just look better and better with time! pat yourself on the back!!

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  5. Hi there - I popped over from a GardenWeb link and spent the last hour entranced by your blog. I love, love your garden and especially your beautiful roses. I'm in northern California and have just started my love affair with David Austin roses this year (we finally moved into a house from an apartment). I don't have much sunny space, but I want to collect all of them! Thank you for the beautiful blog. I'll be back often.

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