August Morning Miscellany


  Mantis in the morning
 Echinopsis seedling



Oh, x Pachyveria 'Haageana Tolimanensis' is going to bloom.  Cool!
Oh, Agave nizandensis is going to bloom.  Noooooo!
 When this stem of roses was developing, it got spritzed with Spinosad:
 When this stem of roses was developing, it did not get spritzed with Spinosad:

 That's an August early morning here, the in-pajamas cup of coffee tour.  How does your early August morning look? 

Comments

  1. Flap. Slap. Another spider web in the face. Temp 63.7F. Dew point 61F. Soon it will be dewy and I'll see see them before I wear them.

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    1. We had some lovely cool fog this morning. I get those spiders in the face too. Not my favorite thing.

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  2. Hello dear hoover boo
    It s so fantastic that you have so many beautiful things to share. And most of this beauty s i never beard about before.
    Have a wonderful day and please keep posting.
    Rosehugs marijke

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    1. You are very kind, Marikje. Thank you!

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  3. The Spinosad clearly works! I've been delighted by a host of butterflies this August. Less delightful, there were signs of a serious raccoon intrusion at the fountain last night. My husband pulled our security video for me - 3 separate visits, 2 involving a pair of marauders. Based on what appears to be a patch of missing fur on the back of one raccoon, it seems that I had a trio of raccoons here last night, making mischief.

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    1. Lots and lots of butterflies here--not so many Monarchs, but the big yellow and black ones, Western Giant Swallowtail, and the little yellow ones (sulphurs and dogfaces) and the checkers, white and black ones, blues and hairstreaks. Must have been the winter rain. There's a big field of Eriogonum nearby.

      Racoontube! Must be fascinating, yet annoying. Oh what can be done so that they stick to the neighbor's lawns and leave your flowers alone?

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  4. I feel you with the chili thrips and Spinosad. That's exactly what I do in my garden this time of year (I've been lazy about it though, this year). I find its the best way to keep the Chili Thrips at bay without destroying the entire balance of good insects. Since they only attack the new growth, that's all that needs spraying. Its a constant battle, but better than using an atomic bomb.

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    1. I've been very careful with the Spinosad since we have predator insects aplenty but they don't do anything about the thrips. Constant battle, that is exactly right--just enough but no more, finding that minimum...

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  5. My one rose, Mutabilis in a pot, has had buds afflicted as in your last photo. Remember that Mutabilis in the PNW? That was my vision, as yet unrealized. I doubt I'll be spritzing Spinosad, but what a savior for your garden it's been.

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    1. The Mutabilis in Portland was unreal. Would not even bother here. Amazing what is awesome there is meh here--and here (for example) the Castor bean is a weed but there it is quite mannerly...ah, climate!

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    2. I'm wondering if Rosa mutabilis doesn't like the coastal weather? It is and always has been one of my best roses next to Cecile Brunner here in the San Gabriel Valley.

      Do either of you remember the huge one at the Huntington? When you entered the Rose Garden from the Shakespeare Garden and turned left away from the Tea Room it was a featured specimen at the end of the path. Gone now these many years since renovation of the Rose Garden.

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    3. Jane I think a little bit of chill shuts it down a while and when it warms up again in spring it just bursts into an incredible mass of flowers.

      I remember the Huntington's 'Mutabilis' vaguely. I had it in my garden and it was a real under performer. The one we saw in Portland where it is just barely hardy was jaw-dropping.

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    4. We're just out of its range here; they're easy and gorgeous in the Carolinas. On my relatively short list of "if-only" plants.

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  6. We have to get up early to enjoy the garden before the heat and smoke make it unbearable. Now I'm in my cool basement studio enjoying your pj tour. (taking note of Spinosad...must look for some of that)

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    1. I heard about the smoke. When we have fires here I have to stay inside so I know how bad it is. Hope it clears up for you soon. Cool sounds good right now. 90F here tomorrow.

      Enjoy the basement!

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  7. Your Agave nizandendis doesn't look all that big. This species must flower at quite a young age. Too bad you couldn't enjoy it longer.

    I saw a praying mantis yesterday when watering in the morning. I was excited!

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    1. The plant is 20" wide and the flower stalk is 52" tall. I got it in 2015, was surprised to see it bloom so soon.

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  8. Such cool plants. Agave is too cute. I love unusual plants. The first Wisteria opened today, early this year, still 2 weeks until spring. 25°C today.

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    1. Spring in 2 weeks: enjoy! Here the Wisteria begins and finishes in about 2 weeks.

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