Succulent Tapestry With Blue Glass

This spectacular succulent tapestry previously blogged had been slightly reworked since my last visit. Small slices of slate and other stones have  been set on edge into arcs, with Echeverias and other succulents set into patterns made by the stones.  This replaced the pinwheels of echeverias at the edge of the bed.  Less plants, more stone edging.  We  know the maintenance required to keep elaborate patterns of flowering annuals looking good, but maintenance is also required to keep elaborate displays of succulents at a spectacular level.

Blue Echeveria embedded in blue glass chips:
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Aloe variegata in blue-grey beach pebble on top, Echeveria ('Afterglow', perhaps)  below:
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And a variegated Agave attenuata. Oh my!
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Comments

  1. Nice job! And so much more rewarding than flowering annuals! Love the var. A. attenuata...mine is down to just the center "cone" after a long tough winter. Hopefully it will spread it's leaves rapidly or else it just might go bye-bye!

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  2. I'm whining now, but I never see that variegated A. attentuata for sale. Truly, there is no end to clever things that can be done with succulents.

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  3. Thanks Danger. Hopefully some warm weather can revive your attenuata! Such an elegant Agave.

    Denise: Lowe's, believe it or not.

    Thanks Sandra!

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  4. Denise, I don't know where you live, but just yesterday I was at California Cactus Center in Pasadena, Ca and I saw that they have many of those Varigated Agave Attenuata that you are gaga over.You might want to visit their website to inquire further as to price, etc.They definitely caught my eye, too!Awesome, beautiful and unusual!They have many other beautiful and unusual plants as well.If you can ever make a visit, it will be well worth it.I love it there!:) Not sure of their website addy, just google California Cactus Center and you will find it:)

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  5. Would this work in different parts of the country? Say, Maryland?? We're a couple of hours from the ocean......

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    1. Hi MissNikiF. It absolutely would work in your part of the country--EXCEPT you would be using a completely different palette of plants.

      You have--I am guessing--humid fairly hot summers, and winters that might get down to--low 20's? The plants in this post have serious trouble with humid heat and winter lows below roughly 30F. That doesn't mean you can't have a great succulent tapestry. You just need to choose plants that can handle humid heat and winters that get colder than the winters in Southern California. I would look at cold-hardy sedums--there are plenty--and at Sempervivums, succulent plants that form rosette shapes, but that can handle cold winters. Whether they handle hot humid summers--that would be something for you to investigate. Also look at small alpine-type plants, such as dwarf conifers. Again you'll have to determine what works in your particular climate. Another thing you may have to do is create small berms or rocky little hills to provide excellent drainage. Have lots of fun experimenting and learning. :)

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  6. That Echeveria resembles my Echeveria Neon Breakers with its green core, then purple with pink margins. My Afterglow looks more "glowing" throughout. :)

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    1. Could be! There are so many hybrids. Beautiful no matter what the name. :)

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