New Tree, Old Iris, The Art Of The Screen Is Patience

I blogged about Iris 'Thornbird' back in 2011.  It's still a member of the garden, though not a favorite.  It was under planting a long-gone pink rose, a most unfortunate color combination.  At present its neighbors are Aeonium haworthii and Haloragis erectus 'Wellington Bronze'.  They make a fair pair--the olive and purple with bronze, the green of the Aeonium matching the green of the iris foliage.  Better than a pink rose, anyway.
Aeonium haworthii and Haloragus 'Wellington Bronze' photo 4-29-6324_zpsdb34ea9a.jpg
Iris have not gotten much attention from me lately.  My fail?
Iris 'Thornbird' photo 4-29-6323_zpsf2ece4d9.jpg

Iris 'Thornbird' photo 4-29-6312_zps91dc48cc.jpg   
Because of temperatures predicted to be in the upper 90s F this week, I was busy putting potted plants into deep shade and soaking down a few of the more vulnerable plants.  A few weeks ago I bought a Magnolia stellata 'Royal Star'.  Priced at 70% off, it looked really healthy.  It was 70% off because the bloom was finished.  Plants here don't sell, usually, if they are not in bloom.  I've been wanting a small deciduous Magnolia for a while.

Turns out I actually had a spot for a small tree out front.  As it grows it will eventually screen out the house across the street... 
Newly planted Magnolia stellata 'Royal Star' photo 
4-29-6332_zps687fd1f6.jpg
...and the house up the street, from certain places in the garden.  The standard rose will need to move, but not for a while:  M. stellata is a slow grower.

 photo 4-29-6334_zpse2ab2c02.jpg
Me and my search for screening.  But look at the sense provided when the lower neighboring house vanishes behind a mass of climbing rose:
 photo 4-29-6340_zps1257a6f6.jpg
It provides a feeling of being out in nature, rather than on a street of houses.  I think that is quite a wonderful thing.  Eventually this other house on the street will disappear behind the little Quercus agrifolia I planted from an acorn.  
 photo 4-29-6335_zps2b1eaec4.jpg
Sooner than you would think--the oak can be 10' tall (3 m) within five more years--I hope...
The 'Dynamite' Crape Myrtles are developing into a fine screen.  Though it seems another is needed...
 photo 4-29-6337_zps5ae7c95f.jpg
...it really isnt.  The tree will widen out enough to screen out at least the window of the house across the street.  Most people are in such a hurry for results they cram multiple trees together.  I'm trying to achieve long-term beauty and healthy plants that can thrive and reach their full potential.

The other 'Dynamite' is perfectly placed already:
 photo 4-29-6338_zps28ed024e.jpg 
Outside now the wind is thrashing the roses and turning them into brown crumbles.  I'm glad I got a few shots of the Iris before the wind hit.  
Iris 'Thornbird' photo 4-29-6327_zpsa8fb52dc.jpg

  

Comments

  1. That is a lovely plant combination in the second photo. And I love the Crape Myrtles as they are, it looks very picturesque. But then I am not looking at as a view from my house and I totally understand wanting a bit of privacy.

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    1. That Crape Myrtle has exceeded all expectations. If it never bloomed it would still be a fabulous small tree.

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  2. That iris is stunning! Did it survive the winds?

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    1. Nope. :( There's always next year...

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  3. Congratulations on your patience which will yield a far more pleasant result than the crammed in tree approach which eventually requires removal of half of the plants. I love the way your garden appears to be set in the rolling hills when screened from the other homes in your hood!

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    1. I'm glad someone understands what I am after! Makes me feel not quite so weirdo. Thanks.

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  4. Hah! I went to your old post to see the Iris with the pink rose, but you had refused to post photos of it. I'll take your word for it, I have a pretty good imagination. It looks good with the bronzey Haloragis. It's what I think of as old-fashioned colors, like something that used to be brighter but then faded. I'm working on long term screening here too.

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    1. I was just too embarrassed by my own bad taste!

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  5. That second image is just delicious!

    Yesterday I was out studying my new view trying to see into the future and how my plants will grow and screen. It's a challenge for sure...

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    1. But oh, the satisfaction when a neighbor's window finally vanishes!

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  6. The new pairing with the Iris is delicious. Your screening is working out well too. I need to find plants to screen neighbors across ridges on 2 sides of our house but identifying the right plants to mix with the established trees isn't easy...

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    1. I thought about a lot of different options over several years before deciding on the Crape Myrtles. Taking my time and thinking through different options really helped. Seems to be another instance when not rushing paid off. I'm sure you will find the right plants--or they will find you. :)

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  7. Beautiful shots of garden. It is wise not to cram too many plants together like most people tend to do.

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    1. They can't reach their full potential if they are crowded. Seems fair to give them a chance.

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  8. I so enjoy your notes on screening. I have the same goals for our property from a number of vantage points. Eliminating other people's buildings from my view makes my property feel larger. I find the tricky spots are often the very narrowest bits of ground.
    I think you've found the perfect color companion for your unusual iris!
    Happy gardening!

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    1. Yes narrow is tricky. I'm still working on a couple of those myself.

      Happy screening!

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    2. "Eliminating other people's buildings from my view makes my property feel larger."

      Yes, that's what I meant to say. You said it better! :)

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  9. Lovely garden views, love your climate. The Iris is more than beautiful, I should like to have such a jewel in my garden.

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