Bloom Day January 2015

In January, Aloes are the stars.  

Still quite a few roses--I'm cutting back the roses so the house is full of flowers.
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The problem with reblooming Hydrangeas is that they rebloom far longer than you want them to--long after their leaves are brown or yellow.  Looks rather dreadful.
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The first Clematis flower of 2015--rather early.  
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I finally got a photo of the hummingbird on her nest.  Of course backside out, but there she is.  I'm avoiding the area as much as possible so as not to disturb her.
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Aloe ferox and marlothii
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Aloe cameronii
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Aloe striata.  If you look closely at the center of the plant, you may see another flower stalk beginning to emerge.
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The recent good rains have brought forth nectar-rich flowers from Metrosideros 'Spring Fire'.  Good for Mrs. Hummer.
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A lone, perfect Camellia--no nectar there, but it's so beautiful.  For the past several years hot winter weather browned and shiveled most all the Camellia japonica flowers.  In rainy years, botrytis ruins them.  This one perfect flower, unmarred, is therefore quite a treat.
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And this is the big surprise of the month.  Can you see it?
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I circled it.  
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The Dasylirion longissimum is going to have its very first bloom late this spring!  I purchased it as a two gallon size about ten years ago.  It has probably taken its time to bloom because of the drought.  The flower stalk on this plant is enormous--it can be nine feet tall (2.75 M).  As we saw at the Huntington last year, bees adore Dasylirion flowers, so the entire population of the local hive may be here in a few months drinking up the nectar and rolling ecstatically in pollen.  It will possibly be May's Bloom Day star.  Speaking of May dreams,  please visit May Dreams for more beautiful blooms.  Happy Bloom Day!
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Comments

  1. Very apt to start with Aloes, at their blooming element this time of the year!

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    1. Their bright color in the clear winter light--it's a treat after the holiday sparkle is gone.

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  2. Of course all of us here in the Far Frozen North are green with envy of all your flowers, but I can only dream of summer and roses. Still it is a beautiful dream, and your roses are so lovely, as well as the perfect Camellia and the aloes. The hummer on her nest is so adorable! It's great she has so many flowers to enjoy.

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    1. Stay warm by the fire with those seed & plant catalogs! Spring is on the way.

      I'm so happy I was able to give the hummers a plentiful array of food, even if it was not perfectly intentional.

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  3. So happy to see Mrs Hummer feeding the chicks inside her nest, they must be very small. The aloe blooms are spectacular, the white camellia is very beautiful, always a lovely surprise to find a flower spike on any plant, so happy that your Dasylirion will blossom. I would love a pure white hydrangea.
    xoxoxo ♡

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    1. They are still eggs, I think. I would like to stick a mirror on the underside of that overhang, then I could see into the nest.

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  4. How exciting! I can't wait to see the Dasylirion longissimum bloom. Surely you'll keep us updated along the way?

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    1. Oh yes! I need to get another photo already--the stalk is already noticeably taller.

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  5. Having waited 25 years for a Strelitzia to bloom I can well understand your excitement for the Dasylirion. I look forward to witnessing its meteoric rise.

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  6. When I bought my first Aloe a couple of years ago I didn't realize that they were winter bloomers. It's been one of the greatest delights about them for me, and has kept me going this winter.

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    1. That's great! Yours is a beauty. I bought my first Aloe for the foliage that turned bright red--didn't even think about the flowers.

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  7. Tempting me again with the Metrosideros!

    Congratulations on the Dasylirion flower stalk - that'll be something to watch develop. I love the photo of the hummingbird on her nest - with as many hummingbirds as I have zooming though my garden, I'm surprised I've never found a nest here.

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    1. Of course her backside was turned to the camera. Sigh.

      I'm impressed with the Metrosideros, just sayin'. ;^)

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  8. Those aloes are a bright spot for January. That Dasylirion bloom will be fun to watch after all this time. There are several plants in my garden that will take a while too.

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    1. The patient shall be rewarded. We hope.

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  9. Your aloe bloom photos always help me through winter. Now that there's a hummingbird nest too... wishing I had a work-related reason to get to SoCal soon. :)

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    1. Thanks, Alan. Hope whenever you visit the weather is good--but we're hoping for more rain ASAP.

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  10. I have to wonder if the hummingbird isn't the true star. The aloes, metrosideros, etc, seem to be more of a supporting cast. That's one fortunate hummingbird :)
    Max P.

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    1. Such a tiny star she is. I'm happy she has so many food sources available--and that the food sources are so pretty.

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  11. I featured an Aloe in my Bloom Day post, then referred people here to see what a REAL Aloe flower can look like.

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    1. Your yellow jasmine is as brilliantly colored as any flower here, and your dainty Aloe as pretty. And you get rain. Grrr!

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  12. My D. wheeleri still seems a little out of shape after blooming this summer. And my Yucca 'Margaritaville' will never be the same again! So I'm of two minds when I seem bloom spikes. But seeing the bees so happy makes up for it, I suppose. That first aloe photo is just eerily beautiful.

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    1. Blooming ruined my Margaritavilles, so I know what you mean. Can't exactly tell them not to, though.

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  13. Lovely roses, I have only ONE in flower right now thanks to an unusually high amount of blackspot. I am cutting down all the roses in a few days’ time, good riddens! Lovely photo of the hummingbird, I always envy you guys over there those, we don’t have hummingbirds in UK. Good luck with your Dasylirion – 9 feet?! Happy GBBD!

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    1. Roses get a fresh start every year--it's something I like about them, despite all the work.

      Yes, 9 feet--or more--it's like an instant tree.

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