Sightings Of Migratory Gardenerds Bloggistanianas, In Habitat

 A small group of the curious, recently discovered species Gardenerds bloggistaniana observed and photographed Saturday at the Huntington Library.  
Very slow moving despite initial morning temperature of 42F (5 C), oblivious to camera noise and other disturbances even at close range, exhibiting attention only to certain types of vegetation, though alert to, and excitable by, avian species in Picidae, Psittacoidea, and Trochilidae. 
Noted constant repetitive, rapid calls at decibel readings from 30 db to 68 db, including whatta-BEAU-ti-FYL-a-GA-ve,  mine-OFF-settz-mine-OFF-settz, and the characteristic its-in-BLOOM-its-in-BLOOM.   
Even at distance, calls were loud and easily identified.
Calls dependent upon vegetation.  Though individuals are decidedly silent and elusive when solitary, in groups, they are boisterous and easily discerned.  
Individuals would occasionally wander off, only to rejoin the group.

Ritualized tool use, constant throughout the observation, which continued for several hours.  


Progress through the habitat extremely slow depending on variety and type of vegetation.  Observers must possess exceptional patience, though the focus of each individual and the group on vegetation and repetitive calls, and the slow-moving pace of their migration, made observation easy.   
 The group lingered in this location for an extended amount of time.
 Observer was able to wander and photograph previously Gardenerds examined plants and then return to find group in the same location. 
Calls continuous and loud at times, accompanied by gesticulation and tool use.  Repeated cessation of migratory progress tedious, but expected.  This species known to be obsessive. 

 The group ventured into an enclosure without hesitation, lured by yet more vegetation.
Types of vegetation that drew Gardenerds and provoked excitement included Aloes and Palms.

 Aloe dichotoma
 Aloe rubroviolacea provoked considerable examination.
 Especially lush areas seem to enthrall the group.  This area provoked more rapid calls and an uptick in tool use. 
 As temperatures rose, the migration slowed.
 Euphorbia
 Aloe vanbalenii
 Oreocereus senilis

 The group showed interest in Opuntia fruits, but no consumption noted. 
 Agaves in particular prompted exclamatory calls indicating what appeared to be joy.  
 A ritual expression-of-delight typical of the genus photographed near the end of the observation.  It is noted that the group disbursed cheerfully in early afternoon, apparently migrating to other vegetation-rich locations.

Report submitted by observer ab.  All photography by ab.  





Comments

  1. This must have been such a lot of fun! Great pictures and creative write-up.

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    1. It was a LOT of fun! Can you tell by the smiles?

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  2. I'm sorry I missed seeing all of you but I'm glad you had a good time! For once, the dry sunny weather was a positive rather than a negative.

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    1. One dry day is ok! Now where is my rain?

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  3. You've described this species well. You gotta' luv um' ... :-)

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    1. Though boisterous in groups, very cheerful!

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  4. LOL, this made my day--heck my YEAR!

    I had such a blast with you and Alan, Denise and Luisa. The 4+ hours flew by in a heartbeat, it seemed.

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    1. We'll have to do Ruth Bancroft as a blogger group--though hopefully they won't throw us all out for being too loud.

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    2. That would be a ton of fun! The RBG staff is very laid back; I know many of them, and they'd love to have us there :-).

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  5. Almost as good as being there...LOVED this post, thank you!

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    1. We were louder than the parrots. I think we scared them off.

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  6. What a hoot! At one point, I noticed other visitors in the Desert Garden, which we seemed to have to ourselves for almost two hours, and it occurred to me briefly that we were talking loudly, gesturing dramatically, and basically acting like we owned the place -- and it felt like for a Saturday morning we did own it! Alan did a fantastic job with documentary duty.

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    1. The DG may never be the same--we may have scared off the parrots.

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  7. Wonderful! I see that dark headed one wandering around here once in awhile. I must be on the migration route!

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    1. Thanks! All it takes is interesting vegetation.

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  8. I LOL'ed so hard :~))) You guys are the best. Super fun morning!

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    1. Wasn't it fun? Poor Alan, putting up with all that endless plant talk. He's my hero.

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    2. Alan can definitely hold his own when it comes to plant talk! I suspect he knows every bit as much as we do :-).

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    3. No way I can hold up to my DW's expertise. I can mostly just repeat stuff I've learned through osmosis :-)

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  9. Fun! Garden bloggers meeting in winter? What a place to meet too! Nice seeing you in some shots Gail, and loved AB's plant closeups, especially of Aloe vanbalenii. Great post!

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    1. He took over the camera duties--I was too busy yakking away. I really like that vanbalenii shot also.

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  10. Although their calls are different, I think I have spotted the same species here. I only wish they were not so rare.

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    1. They migrate far and wide. Perhaps a flock will roll though your area someday. :)

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