Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Wednesday Vignette, January 20, 2016

Blonde and airy Muhlenbergia rigens meets blue and bold Agave.  The Mulenbergia is called "Deer Grass" because deer like to lay on it.  A meadow land pouffe.  

More vignettes await via Flutter And Hum 

Update:  I remember another combination of grass and Agave seen at Cornerstone in Sonoma in 2010:
Stipa tenuissima and Agave photo StipaAgave3.jpg

Green and gold is striking, too. 

22 comments:

  1. This reminds me of the opuntia hidden in South Dakota grasslands, but on a larger scale. Not that I'd want to step on an opuntia, but I definitely don't want to step on an agave!

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    1. At least not barefoot! Agaves crush pretty easily when stepped on, unfortunately. Don't ask me how I know.

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  2. Look nice and soft, but yikes! Would hate to mistakenly lay down on that agave, though...

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    1. The grass would be okay, the Agave, not!

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  3. Grasses and Agaves are such wonderful companions!

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    1. Surprisingly yes they are. Who would have thought?

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  4. I love it! Where did you take the photo?

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  5. I've often wondered why it's called deer grass. I assumed deer eat it but I like your explanation much better. I also like the word pouffe. It should be used more frequently in conversation.

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    1. That deergrass factoid was at the San Marcos website--an invaluable resource for gardenerds.

      Pouffe!

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  6. Your post just goes to prove that grass and agaves are always a perfect pairing.

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    1. And one I never would have thought of!

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  7. This combo (fluffy grass and pretty agave) is one of my favorites. I've been trying to recreate it on a smaller scale, but not as successfully yet.

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    1. You make an excellent point: how to do this on a small scale. The area at Cornerstone was not large--like a small front yard--and was just Stipa tenuissima and A. gentryi 'Jaws' (as I remember--may not be correct) but how does one do that? It means no other plants...a problem for us plant-lover types.

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  8. So beautiful this blue Agave among the grass, just gorgeous. I think a wonderful combination.

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  9. I saw a similar combo this summer but with Eucomus (the dark-leaved one) instead of Agave. It stands out in my mind as one of the best vignettes of the summer's garden visits.

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  10. Grass and agaves - a great combination! Your images, especially the second with the golden light, warm the cockles of my black little heart!

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  11. Great things that are even better together: grass and agaves; grass and opuntias; banjo (percussive) and fiddle (resonant); "pouffe" and "gardenerds." That last is one of the best words ever [nods].

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    1. Words are almost as much fun as plants. :)

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