Tuesday, May 3, 2016

What Was Blooming At The Huntington May Day Morning 2016?


 Above, Romneya coulteri, petals pleated and puckered, in the parking lot.
Below, Calothamnus villosus and Verbena bonariensis.
Salvia clevelandii made the morning smell like wild California.  
  ???  Love the pure blue of these flowers.  Something related to Borage?  So blue...
 Hesperaloe 'Brake Lights', very red...
 Anigozanthos flavidus(?), looking very yellow...
 ...and fabulously tall.  I prefer the tall species Anigozanthos to the shin-high hybrids.
 The entrance garden rill looks different on every visit.  This visit the ribbon of water was hidden by thriving Muhlenbergia rigens, Chondropetalum, red Anigozanthos, yellow blooming Santolina, lavender, yellow Anigozanthos, and Campanulas. 
 Red Bougainvillas on the pillars.  The San Gabriel mountains were dressed in silky clouds. 
 Gasteria acinicifolia
 Uh, Echinopsis?  Tricocereus? 
 Aloe camperi.  There were several large patches of this in the Desert Garden, providing a bright show there as it is doing in our own garden here at home.
 Lots of umbellifers in the Herb Garden, which is at its best in late spring.  Summer heat brings toasted plants. 
 Whatever this is (Queen Anne's Lace?) it sure is photogenic.
 Sweet peas, soon to be toast. 
 These flower heads look like flying saucers.
 Bidens?   Another photogenic scene:

The rose garden was just past peak bloom.  Photo by Beloved.
 Wandering the Huntington was a beautiful way to spend the first May morning of 2016.

16 comments:

  1. So beautiful, isn't it? Even if the herb garden will be toast soon, you know there will be other beautiful views. I love this garden.

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  2. If only i am nearer, we will not look for subjects both wide angle and macro shots. There are only a very few plants which i know from this post. Of course the ubiquitous bougainvillea is one of them, and i've seen the Queen Anne's lace once in NZ. Those yellowish-green flowers are i think called kangaroo paws in Australia, or might just look the same. Lovely shots all of them.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the pics, Andrea. Bougainvillea, ubiquitous indeed.

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  3. The photo of the Bougainvillea with the mountains in the background is wonderful. I planted a Matilija poppy at the bottom of my slope a few months ago and, although I'm guessing I won't get blooms this year, the plant itself seems to be settling in nicely despite (or maybe because of?) the limited water it gets down there.

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    1. You planted a Matilija? Cool! Is that the slope in front? It should do great in your rocky soil.

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  4. Lovely! Makes me want to jump in the car and head down there right now...

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  5. Great shot of the white cactus flowers, looking a lot like a Muppet.

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    1. The white flowers were towering over shorter cacti--as if they were looking for something far, far away.

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  6. Blue, like borage: probably an Anchusa, A. azurea (askant) or A. capensis being most available. Annie's Annuals says that you could drive a truck over A. azurea and it would still bloom -- I'm testing that out this year...

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    1. Testing driving a truck over them? ;^) What a beautiful blue color that Anchusa has. I would like to try a plant like that also. I should have taken a photo of the actual plant--as I remember it had big big leaves, but I'm probably wrong.

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  7. The yellow-green umbellifer could be one of a ton of herbs: dill, fennel, cumin... Here you wouldn't see any of them bloom until at least June, but everything's so much earlier out there. We're just now getting our earliest roses (R. spinosissima, Scotch rose, and its hybrid relatives like 'Harison's Yellow') and tree peonies are blooming.

    I miss the formality of the rill, but that's one gorgeous planting hiding it.

    Is there a difference in ease of growing between the species kangaroo paws and the hybrids? Or do people mainly grow the hybrids for their more manageable size?

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    1. I think the big species Anigozanthos live longer, but I could be wrong. None of them seem to live that long here.

      I'm just not an herb person and pay zero attention to them. My bad! Just enjoyed photographing the flowers.

      The rill was still visible looking straight on, just from the one angle. That was sort of cool. Earliest roses just now?!? Wow!

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  8. herb gdn looks like Bronze fennel, then dill/anise, then green or Finocchio fennel. Dill/anise are the only yellow blooming herbal composites I'm familiar with. Would love to see the garden. Need to find some Central Coast road warriors to do the trip with me. It's a haul!

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    1. It is a long drive. I think I'd rather be further exploring the beauties of the Central Coast!

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