Sunday, July 24, 2016

Getting Through Another Summer Heat Wave


Hot spells remind me of bobbing in the surf at the edge of the sea--a big wave approaches, you see it coming, you hope you can stay above it until it spends itself on the sand.  You get past that wave...then wait for the next big wave.  Hot spells mean being stuck indoors.  Distractions are required. 

This weekend's distraction was a local CSS Show/Sale.  This particular show/sale is all about sale.  The show is mere token.  Something sad about that.  

Show photos by Beloved.  Blogger in shopping mode:

 Hmm.  I missed these Aloes when looking for A. vaombe, though the search was casual.  Focused on pots, not plants this time.

 I can ID some of the cactus now by sight.  That's a step forward.  Notocactus magnifica...uh, maybe.  Mammillaria plumosa!
 The so-called "moon cactus".  The colorful portion is a mutant Gymnocalycium mihanovichii, grafted onto a green Hylocereus stem.  The Gymnocalycium produces no chlorophyll and therefore cannot survive on its own.  The Hylocereus roots provide nutrients.  Eventually the graft fails because the Hylocereus outgrows the scion.  Never saw the attraction, myself, but they sell. 
 Peety Pots:  I got the one indicated by the red arrow.
 This was pretty much the entire show.  It's an exhibition rather than show--no judging.  Pretty plants.
 Hmm...what's that Aloe there in the lower left...no, hey, now stop it with the shopping!
 Back at home, I got old plants into new pots on the shady patio.  Repotting can be a messy process.  Canning tongs inside an orange silicon dollar-store potholder are useful for repotting spiny cactus.  The blooming Aloe will go into the pot to its right when done blooming.
 Add Aloe deltoideodontea 'Sparkler' to the list of summer-bloomers:
 Four new pots.  A clustering Agave victoriae-reginae, a neglected Aloe krapholiana,  Echinopsis 'Charlemagne',  Echinopsis open pollinated seedling.
 Just about to get back inside because it's 90F even on the shaded patio, one notes that the small potted Cycas revoluta has a new crop of foliage. 
 We feel like our plants these days, curling up, closed off, hunkering down to avoid the sun. 
Aloe microstigma:
 Natasha knows exactly what to do.  Find a cool spot and relax.
 I did brave the broil to try another shot of the first Ratibida flower.  The rays have developed and colored.  The actual flowers are those little yellow dots. 

19 comments:

  1. At least Beloved follows you around and shows an interest. We have to go to any show via a newspaper seller. He then finds coffee shop, sits down with paper and refuses to budge. He does provide creche facilities and help lugging the haul home. There is that.

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    1. Perhaps he is staying out of your way and letting you wander to your heart's content? There is something in that. :)

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  2. The curling up, hunkering down plant with the three colors - green, red, and white ... is very beautiful. Does it have a name?

    My berries, yellow alpine strawberrie (old) and Raspberry Shortcake™ Dwarf Thornless Raspberry (new) have taken a hit with this latest heat wave. Very burned leaves. What are the propagators thinking when say it needs "full sun"?

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    1. Yes, thanks for pointing out it needs a name. Aloe microstigma, microstigma meaning tiny spots, which it has. It's actually looking a lot less stressed than last year since I bumped up the irrigation just a bit. Colors are great, I agree.

      I was wondering about that raspberry. Monrovia has had some failures lately. It's a tough tough business to be in.

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  3. Is it wrong to find the stressed Aloe beautiful?

    Hope this heat wave is a short one for you.

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    1. It's not so totally stressed--the green center shows its photosynthesizing and growing. :) Yes, those colors--yummy!

      Thought it would break today...now maybe tomorrow...

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  4. I love that Ratibida flower. Your contorted Aloe makes me feel less terrible about mine - hopefully, both will spring back when cooler weather returns. Natasha and my Pipig have the same hot weather game plan.

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    1. Natasha and Pipig know how to relax. They are pros.

      I read several places A. microstigma is easy to kill with too much water, so I've held back...but it can take more than I thought. It's better this year.

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  5. The Ratibida flower is fascinating, esp since you explained what the flower part actually is. Loverly! We are having a very hot spell in NoCal also…in such heat, can you actually overwater full sun succulents? I am using an umbrella to shade them from the extreme heat as they are sunburning. Not sure what to do re watering? So far just watching and watering as needed. Are there easy over/under watering signs to look for before it's too late?

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    1. In extreme heat, generally succulents shut down and wait it out, so they should not be watered. If you can rig up full shade for them until it cools off, that would be the best thing you can do. They will recover.

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  6. Hot hot hot here too. I don't think I've left the house today. I feel like curling up, like the aloes.

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    1. Yeah, me too. I hate staying indoors.

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  7. Oh, those peety pots looks really cool, I'd have loved shopping there. And -- canning tongs, brilliant!

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  8. I feel for you all down there Our summer so far has been much to my liking, but I hear we have higher temps to expect up here too, in the coming week. Not as bad as yours, though - I saw 92 mentioned. I like your new pots and the treasures in them, and the Ratibida is fabulous. I had no idea the little yellow dots are the flowers - love how gardening teaches me something new every day. :)

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    1. Except for 2 heat blasts now, our summer has been much much much better than the past two or three. 2014 was particularly horrible.

      Yes, gardening is the greatest thing! Daisies have their own special structure, here's a good diagram: https://www.anbg.gov.au/PLANTFAM/AUST1F.HTM

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  9. I should've attended that show since I'm on the lookout for a small Aloe rubroviolaceae. I'm just now starting to get "cactus eyes" too -- nowhere near Gerhard's, but at least I'm growing out of cactus blindness a bit.

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    1. Roger's had that one, but call...they might be all gone. Not small, though. 3 gallon size. Arid Lands has it off and on.

      I think the thing with cactus is to have the place for them first--either in the ground or a special area for the pots. Their spines are to be respected!

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  10. A show, great place to stay cool indeed. Nice haul and that stressed aloe looks good! Hope you get a break from the heat wave soon!

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