Spring/Summer Project 2017

Now that the overhanging trees are gone,  I'm pondering how to repair the damage the overhangers did to the gully area.  A new pergola would be nice.  The inexpensive one here was always intended to be temporary, and it's crumbling.
 The Pittosporums are ruined, being mostly bare, and leaning at an angle.  Can they be rehabbed?  Cut back by about half, they are sprouting new growth, but...???  Better to remove and replace? 
 The Key Lime is also leaning due to the Euc and palms that shaded it.   Trimming will improve it, however trimming must wait until autumn, after citrus leaf-miner season.  At least the poor little tree has considerable foliage, thanks to our rainy winter.  
 In 2015 I removed all but two of the roses that were once here, because of the drought and crown gall infections.  This winter a blanket of nasturtiums sprouted and covered the area.  It's now time to pull them out, in advance of summer heat. 
 This area once had a Hydrangea.  I replaced it with a more climate-appropriate Ceanothus, which has not grown one single inch in--two years?  It's actually smaller than it was when we bought it.  It's on notice--grow or get shoveled.  Grr!  

I added a couple of Dahlias as temporary plants for the summer.  There are some random Aeoniums.  The little Acer palmatum 'Emperor I' seems healthier due to our rainy winter. I wonder if I could add another.  Something to screen the pond filters from the neighbor's view.  I have some 'Green Tower' boxwood that could be moved...another large-growing, very fragrant Austin rose would be lovely...
Some bits of the area look good.  The three 'Bishops Castle' roses are putting on a first-rate show this spring.  This area gets a bit colder than the rest of the garden, so 'Bishops Castle' bursts into flower in a manner somewhat more like it would in a colder climate. 
More flowers opening every day.
 It's very fragrant, 'Bishop's Castle'.  Old rose with a touch of vanilla.  Mmmm! 
 There is a brief time in the morning when most of the shrubs are still in shade, but the sun lights up the Pittosporum 'Ivory Sheen'.  I love this moment:
If I can make the rest of the area look this good, I'll be happy.  Digging and planning and thinking commence. 

Comments

  1. Those are the nicest kinds of quandaries to have! Ceanothus do seem to grow slowly. I planted a Ceanothus arboreus from a 4-inch pot 2 years ago and last year came close to pulling it out as I was sure it was shrinking but this year's rains gave it a major boost. It's still less than a foot tall and currently in danger of being swamped by a Matilija poppy but it's now showing more promise so it's been given a reprieve.

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    1. We had some Ceanothus that the landscaper put in originally, and they grew like weeds. I think 'Concha'. I was expecting the same from this plant ('Ray Hartman') and am disappointed it didn't happen. Oh, well!

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  2. I am currious to see how your special place will look after you took the palmtree's out a couple of month's later Hoover Boo. Your vieuws are already breathtaking.
    Have a wonderful day.
    Rosehugs Marijke

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    1. I am curious, too! Now I am wondering if a climbing rose would be good screening on the fence. Suddenly, so many possibilities! I will be blogging the project again as it progresses.

      Have a beautiful day, Marijke!

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  3. Your Bishop's Castles are the entire reason why I bought 3 of them never having seen or sniffed them before. Yours are still looking fabulous!

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    1. How are they doing? Are you pleased with them?

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  4. Oooh - those ROSES!!! They defy just about every description I can think up... I bet the fragrance perfumes that entire part of your garden. My guess is that the pittosporums will come back alright - even after some pretty heavy pruning. The question is how long you are willing to give them...

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    1. The fragrance from them is wonderful. It draws me back there several times a day. I'm willing to give the Pittos some time. I'll see how they do this year. Their root systems are well established, so it's worth a try.

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    2. I've been astonished by the speed of regeneration from a mature root system: I cut a tea viburnum to the base fall before last when the original shoots all seemed to lose vitality at the same time. Then last season it put up a dozen new shoots, all strong. I cut off half of them last fall, and this year every one of the new shoots is blooming; it took only one season of regrowth to recreate the full-sized shrub at full performance.

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    3. Exactly, Nell. That's what I'm hoping for. Only unsure if I should take the Pittosporums down farther for their own good, or if that will make it more difficult for them. I'm hedging (oops, pun!) my bets by interspersing some Toyon (native shrub) seedlings between the Pittosporums, just in case the Pittos can't recover.

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