Sunday Miscellany

Rose 'Jardin de Bagatelle' is often blotched by Botrytis, scarred by Thrips, or misshapen by extreme weather.  Every so often, as seen in the above flower, it is sweet perfection.

Saturday we went out looking for possible plants for the west slope, didn't find what we were looking for, and came home instead with a plant for the east slope, which needs some cover besides mulch.
Already in the ground.  I bought a plant I had a place for!
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 Grevillea 'Austraflora Fanfare' is predicted to grow 12" tall and up to 15' wide.  That part of the slope gets about 6 hours of sun;  this Grevillea is said to have no objection to part shade.
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I liked the shaggy effect of the toothy foliage;  that it also has bright red flowers from late winter into spring, to feed bees and hummingbirds, is pure bonus.
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We also managed a visit to Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont.  The drought has not been kind.  
 A well established Douglas Fir, dead.
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Cool contemporary sunshade, easier on the eyes than dead trees.
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Native oaks looked better.
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There were almost no visitors.
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A rill and reflecting pool
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Shadows, reflections, and fallen leaves created an abstract pattern.
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A strong feeling of Autumn, despite the dry heat.  
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Comments

  1. I've been trying to think of a place to put that same Grevillea since I saw it at a local nursery. I didn't know it can handle some shade - that opens new possibilities.

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    Replies
    1. The general comments are it might bloom less, but I can live with that. A shaggy carpet on a slope is what I'm aiming for, I think that would look cool.

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  2. Grevillea 'Austraflora Fanfare' is great. Had one that did really well and flowered, then it died. Wh? Its drip emitter was turned off. Did I do it? Or some mischievous passer-by (it was planted next to the street)? Another mystery. But I will replace it, I liked it that much.

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    Replies
    1. I had a similar experience with a beautiful ground cover Manzanita, carefully gave it its own dripper to get it through the first summer. Then it died. I investigated and I realized I had not turned the dripper valve on. Entirely my fault. I felt terrible.

      Thanks for your experience with the Grevillea. I saw it on your blog after I bought mine and thought, Okay, it may have been a good choice after all. And your comment reminds me I need to give it a dripper today.

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  3. No luck with grevillias, but I sure do admire that one.

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    Replies
    1. I'm surprised at how well 'Coastal Gem' and 'Moonlight' have done. I wasn't expecting them to be all that great. Is it too cold for them where you are?

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  4. So sad seeing mature trees cark it :( what a shame.

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    Replies
    1. It was a shock. You expect the newly planted ones to struggle, but not one so long established. Still, there were tiny green seedlings at its base, so there is hope!

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