Re-rooting An Aloe

UPDATED November 3, 2010, September 2012, and November 17, 2014
Worrisome black areas on stem
I purchased a rooted Aloe pseudorubroviolacea via mail order in December.  On arrival, Aloe didn't look that great (soft and soggy) and my efforts to help it did not go well.  Even in perfect drainage, what small roots it had rotted away, and the end of the stem was black and soft.  I cut off all of the blackened area, leaving a stub of clean, firm stem.   I let the cut end dry thoroughly for three days in a cool, shady place before setting it into dry potting mix with added pumice.  No water.  After a month, it developed the roots seen in the above photo.  There are some worrisome looking black areas on the side of the stem.  I'll put the Aloe back into the dry potting mix until I (hopefully) get a more substantial root system. 
Aloe re-rooted
Almost two months later, more roots.  That's all there was to it.  Make a clean cut to firm healthy tissue.  Let the cut dry.  Place in dry gritty mix in the shade (so the plant doesn't dry out), and wait.  When the roots begin to grow, start to water sparingly.  Gradually, as the roots further develop, bring the Aloe out of the shade to the level of light it requires according to the species or cultivar.  Some people recommend a dusting of cinnamon on the cut and stem, becaue cinnamon has known anti-fungal properties;  I didn't do that, but it wouldn't hurt. 
UPDATE:  November 3, 2010.  Root system is developing, even in perfectly dry potting soil:
Aloe pseudorubroviolacaea
I've moved it to a slightly larger pot since the roots were peeking out from the drain hole, and began to water it once every two weeks, giving it a couple of hours of very early morning sun.
Update September 2012:
In the ground, and growing!
Aloe pseudorubroviolacaea photo 
sat8474_zpsfeedb1de.jpg
Update 11/17/2014:  in the ground, happy and healthy and over 26" wide (66 cm).  It bloomed last year for the first time.
 photo pseudo4860_zpse3bbdd43.jpg

Guide to the Aloes of South AfricaAloes: The genus Aloes

Comments

  1. I stumbled onto this whist searching for "rooting aloes" and found this very helpful - Will keep you all posted on my own success with this - have subscribed to the blog..................

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    Replies
    1. Hi John, happy this was in some way helpful. Do let us know how your Aloe progresses! I should update this post once more--the Aloe in the post is now 4' in diameter and healthy. All's well when it ends up growing. :)

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