Rose Growth Habits And Development

Hybrid Tea, large and upright ('Peter Mayle'):
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Hybrid Tea, some branching ('Rose Rhapsody'):
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Another ('Pope John Paul II', own root):
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Floribunda, much twiggier than a Hybrid Tea ('Julia Child'):
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Austin Rose, petite and shrubby ('Jubilee Celebration'):
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Austin Rose, arching and branching ('Lady Emma Hamilton'):
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Austin Rose, a future octopus ('Wildeve'):
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Austin Rose, upright and twiggy ('Tamora', own root and well established at 10 years of age):
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Austin Rose, monster ('Golden Celebration', own root at 5 years of age):
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Austin Rose, upright and shrubby ('The Ambridge Rose', well established at 10 years of age):
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One can see the greater number of canes on some of the well established own root (not grafted) roses.  'Tamora' is a good example.  To get the same number of basal canes all from one (grafted) bud union would be difficult.

Here is a fairly clear example of how rose growth develops as the plant establishes.  "I" shows the juvenile growth of a newly purchased plant.  "II" shows the first growth after planting in my garden--larger and more substantial.  "III" shows the beginnings of established growth.  This rose, Austin's 'Wildeve', will be larger than advertised, which is typical for the mild Southern California climate.  'Wildeve' was planted last spring and is not yet mature nor fully established.  It was a grafted specimen.  The graft has been placed just below ground level in the hopes of the plant eventually own-rooting itself and producing more basal canes than a grafted plant normally would. 

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All that, for this:
Rosa 'Abraham Darby'

Comments

  1. Wow, you leave a lot more side branches and thin growth than I do. Maybe that is why your roses get so big! I'm still pruning....

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  2. Hi Azure! I've been leaving the twiggy stuff to (hopefully) prevent sunburn on the canes--rather a lot of that this past year. I'll see if that helps at all.

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  3. Hoov, I will soon be doing my first major pruning, and your photos are very helpful. I was wondering about all the little twiggy growth on my young Clotilde Souperts. Should I cut them all off, leaving only major canes? Your photos show that I should leave them, so thanks much!

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  4. I would take off any dead and/or diseased material, sherryocala. Then just very lightly tip prune off the remains of any dead flowers.

    Leave major shaping for 3rd or 4th growing season. CS assumed a naturally rounded shape here without much help.

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  5. Love your blog! Wondering if you could tell me more about your experience with Jubliee Celebration - curious if you have any photos of the entire bush in bloom? I'm thinking of adding several next year - would you recommend it? Many thanks! Cole

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    Replies
    1. Hi Cole, I do recommend it, but keep in mind that rose performance is very, very climate-dependent. What is a great rose here could be a terrible rose in your area. For example, 'Iceberg' is a stellar performer here in Southern California, but in most of the rest of the world it is a disaster. It is always wise to see if you can find someone who grows it in your neighborhood or nearby, for the best idea of how it will perform.

      Generally from comments I have read, Jubilee Celebration is a good performer in a number of areas. I could not find a good April spring bloom photo offhand, but you can see the growth habit of JC on these posts:

      http://pieceofeden.blogspot.com/2014/02/the-evolution-of-one-garden-area-2010.html (especially 3rd photo from last)

      and

      http://pieceofeden.blogspot.com/2012/05/empty-ground-update.html

      It's a shorter, somewhat open habit. I've pushed 5 or 6 together as a hedge which gives a more lush appearance to the plants.

      Hope that helps.

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  6. Thanks - this is helpful! Jubilee Celebration does not seem to be grown by many folks - it sure seems like a beautiful and unique rose. I am thinking of doing something similar by planting 4-5 plants together as a hedge. Thanks for all the additional info!

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