The Remaining Huntington Photos, Mostly Roses

'Paul Bocuse':
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More photos from the Huntington visit from this past weekend.  One thing I thought odd:  in the two big double beds of Austin roses, someone had stuck in a couple of random HT's, the red striped  'Rock and Roll' was wedged in between something like 'The Nun' and 'Hilda Murrel'.  Were they that desperate for space?
'Perdita':
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The 'Temple of Love' was surrounded by a mass planting of 'Tamora' for many years.  It appears 'Tamora' has been replaced by 'Iceberg'.  I love the curve of that path.
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'English Garden':  Their 'English Garden' is a little bigger than my 'English Garden'.  Flowers look identical, though.
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'Teasing Georgia' was a large shrub with just a couple of flowers that day:
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'Sally Holmes', looking great that day, but she won't do much else for the rest of the year.
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In general, the roses were in full spring flush, much later than mine!
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The can-be-beautiful 'Pierre de Ronsard' (aka 'Eden'), so often ruined by thrips and botrytis, looking miraculously good that day:
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I couldn't id this one, and there was no tag.  What species rose is yellow?  Rosa foetida?
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The bees were enjoying it:
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Also in the rose garden, the bark of a giant Mexican Cypress forms a complex pattern:
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In the nearby Shakespeare garden, a Sambucus nigra 'Black Beauty' looked great.  I thought they did not like southern California, but this one obviously does.  It was large and apparently thriving:
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A new young 'Black Beauty' mixed in with cannas, rush, salvias.  Pomegranate in the background.  
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What would be a fine companion for the black Sambucus, but in another area of the Huntington, the Children's Garden.  Santolina 'Lemon Fizz', looking both lemony and fizzy.
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Also in the Children's garden, a once-low-rosette of ornamental kale had become an odd Cussonia-like tower.
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The sky blue of Plumbago (ariculata?):
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The remodeled Japanese garden was reopened, but we did not see the new bits.  When one visits with a large family party, once must go with the flow.  
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Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing this beautiful post and showing a lot of great roses.
    Have a nice evening Hoover

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  2. If I ever make it to so. California, this place is on my must see list. Although I would be more interested in seeing the succulents than the roses, they are indeed beautiful.

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  3. @marijke, thanks!

    @Les, the Desert Garden is spectacular and that is where I usually spend the time, but it just didn't happen that day. It IS a must see, so I hope one day you can visit it. Winter is actually the best time, when all the Aloes are in bloom and the humming birds are zipping all over.

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  4. The yellow rose looks like Golden Showers to me...
    http://www.rose-gardening-made-easy.com/golden-showers-rose.html

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  5. The bees seem to be enjoying rose Golden Wings.
    https://www.google.ca/search?q=rose+golden+wings&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=4j6&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=R6rIT7SdFOqI6AHHvt0q&ved=0CFcQsAQ&biw=885&bih=857

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  6. It might be 'Golden Wings', Marie, thanks.

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  7. I think the yellow one is actually Mrs. Oakley Fisher. But there's an easy way to tell -- Mrs. Oakley Fisher is the size of a hybrid tea -- maybe 5 to 6 feet max. Golden Wings gets ginormous.

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  8. KStrong, thanks. Paul Barden thought 'Little Mermaid'. It was a mound perhaps 6' tall and 8' wide, most definitely a climber or scrambler, not Mrs. F. The flowers while not tiny were on the small side.

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