Drag Queen For A Day


When a plant is too heavy to carry, it can possibly be dragged.  Today, I was drag queen.

While pondering the privacy screen situation for the new pergola, it occurred to me moving some of the often-moved 'Green Tower' boxwood to the area immediately behind the pergola would solve two problems--first, boosting the screening, until I can figure out the Pittosporum situation, and second, providing a better place for the boxwood, which here in Southern California are much happier with some shade.

This plant was the heaviest and largest.  The root balls are like thick pancakes--not deep, but heavy because the roots are fine and hold the soil.  I make an effort to get the entire root ball undisturbed.  It was easy.  This area is a former compost pile location and the soil is as soft and rich as warm butter.  Dug out...
Dig the new location's hole and add water...
 Drag...
 Replant, and water in.  (Yes, that Epidendrum on the left desperately needs re-potting.  Don't nag.)
 Plant, and water in.  Next victim specimen.  Dig...


 Drag...
 ...plant and water in:
Take a rest.  Actually sit under the pergola and look around.  Now we're close to the autumnal equinox (yay!) I trimmed some of the lean off the lime tree.
 Back to work.  Another boxwood to move.  This one was formerly too close to the Metrosideros excelsa, so if not moved, doomed, because the Metrosideros with its much larger root system was eventually going to kill off the boxwood.  Watered into its new spot.  Pavers were handy for holding the hose in place so precious water went exactly where it was supposed to go.
These poor boxwood have been moved four times now.  The big ones (7 feet, 2 meters +) with their root balls are well over 100 lbs (45 kilos) each.  It feels as though the boxwood might have finally, finally found their right place.   Either that, or because they are too heavy to drag again, I'm not moving them again.

There are a couple more smaller, lighter 'Green Tower's I can move, but I needed a rest.  After digging, dragging, and re-planting the boxwood, it was tough to drag myself into the house.  A quick stop on the way in, to photograph 'Pretty Lady Emily' Anemones and starry little Zephyranthes candida blooms.
 What fun to be gardening again in anticipation of autumn!
After recovering somewhat I planted another Grevillea 'Superb', a heat-wave purchase, in the space vacated by two of the 'Green Tower' boxwood.
Lots of sun, a good amount of space, a view from the pergola:
 Yes, another hummingbird lure.
 Then I sat under the pergola again.  It was late afternoon.  The variegated Pittosporum was backlit and sparkled.  Other plants glowed in the golden light.


  It ain't easy being a dragging queen.  One day was enough.  But with foliage and flowers all around, with mild sun and cool breeze, the little pergola felt palatial.  

Comments

  1. Although I read your entire post and marveled at your drag queen performance, I fixated on the soil "as soft and rich as warm butter." Here, that exists only in my imagination.

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    1. I do so appreciate the soil here! Our previous home was on a hill of solid granite with about 3" of soil on the top of it. A shovel would "clank" when digging was attempted.

      How goes your top soil project? The weather is cooperating pretty well.

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  2. Ha ! I wasn't quite sure what to expect when I opened this post Hoov ..but I have done a fair amount of plant-dragging myself-most recently Salvia 'Back and Blue' which weighs about a ton and had to dehydrate for a month in the sun before I could lift it into the yard waste bin.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry to have to scare you, but expect it to be back next spring.

      I've been trying to get rid of 'Black and Blue' for years. It strikes a perfect balance between aggressive garden domination and the gorgeousness of those sapphire blue flowers. Pure evil! I dig down deep every year to remove every last root...and back it comes.

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    2. Oh yes, in fact it's already sprouting here and there, but I am keeping after it. I actually have (had) two-the second one gets dug back by half every year around it's perimeter. I can't bring myself to part with it completely.

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    3. If mine was not in a bad spot (every year threatening to kill a very fine 'Pink Gruss an Aachen') I'd be--mostly happy with it. Those blue flowers are thrilling.

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  3. I can dig it! Good to know there was plenty of rest between all that work so your day wasn't a total drag.

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    Replies
    1. Too much hard work in one day and I turn into a dragon lady.

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  4. I am fascinated, as only another gardener can be perhaps, by your process :). Everything looks wonderful!

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    1. We gardeners are the ones who know how much effort is involved. Being out there gardening is half thrill and half drudgery. We bring balance to the force. ;^)

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  5. haha, great job and win win for you and the boxwood.
    The lighting on you last few photos is amazing and the anemone is perfect!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, bittster! The Anemones are so very photogenic, and that particular cultivar is fairly well behaved, for an Anemone of that type.

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