Burnt

Here's the nearby area that burned on Monday.   Much of the vegetation was native willows because this is a riparian area. It can contain considerable standing water in the rainy season.  Besides the native Willows,  alien and highly flammable Eucalyptus, highly flammable Washingtonia palms, and moderately flammable Acacias. 
 Native Opuntia survived here...
 However, in the distance, burned-out Opuntia clumps on the burnt-bare hill.  
 Burnt palm
There are still fire crews in the area.  This is a helicopter tanker that does water drops.  
In the distance you can see our neighborhood, still green and essentially undamaged. 
 More hot, dry winds predicted for the weekend.  Uh-oh. 

Comments

  1. So scary! My thoughts continue to go out to you, your neighbors, and everyone else affected... Hopefully they'll be able to get things under control soon!

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    1. It's 65% contained as of today, but unfortunately more Santa Ana winds are predicted overnight Saturday into Sunday. Uh-oh!

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  2. How awful. It will be interesting to see how long it takes for vegetation to reappear in these areas.

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    1. The first significant winter rain will bring out some green.

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  3. Ouch! I'm unnerved more than usual about the high winds predicted this weekend too. But we received good news from our sister-in-law up north yesterday - her risk from the fire up there has finally been abated.

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    1. That's great about your family! Nice to hear some good news.

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  4. Poor Peter's Canyon. I'm going to miss it while it regenerates. It had been looking so nice and full lately and in a matter of hours, gone.

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    1. I think it was just the far southern end off Skylark.

      At least those palms burned. I hope more don't spout, that they have budget to remove the very fire-unsafe non-natives, palms, eucs, and acacia seedlings.

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    2. Eucalyptus and acacia we battle here (including our current fire).
      So far the palms are only default landscaping, but not yet a wild problem.

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    3. The Washingtonias reseed like crazy. They are easily ignited by embers.

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  5. Apocalyptic scenes...thanks be you were spared.

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    1. We are thankful, and very lucky...so much worse in NorCal...

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  6. Yes indeed, we are burnt. But some containment at last after days of zero. Gardens are usually a welcome diversion from crises, but one cannot go outside because of the smoke enveloping our town. So I'm looking at pretty plant photos on the computer instead !

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    1. Some good news at last! The news from your area has been horrifying--elderly people unable to get out, that whole neighborhood incinerated. Such a beautiful area. The mask to buy is the N95, apparently. Keeps out the smoke particles. I was able to garden yesterday and it was indeed a diversion and a comfort. I'll be hoping for better news from your area today, take care.

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  7. Oh, these photos are so scary and like Ricki said, apocalyptic. I'll be thinking of you over the weekend, I hope the winds don't send fire your way.

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    1. Thanks, Alison. It will be a watchful weekend. The situation in Napa is much worse.

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  8. Can Opuntia sprout again from the roots as proteas do?

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    1. They could possibly sprout from the base (crown) of the plant. If a pad (leaf) survives underneath others, it could sprout roots and create a new plant.

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  9. Your photos encapsulate all the destruction. Did any houses get destroyed? I'm so relieved your neighborhood is fine.

    Yes, the damn wind picked up again. It howled all night.

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