Puya Shaming

It's hiding behind the Dasylirion

Why have I never blogged about the Puya?  I suppose because it has never flowered and is hard to photograph (inaccessible).  It was in the garden before I started blogging in 2009, but I've never mentioned it, nor posted a photograph of it.  I'm not sure which species it is (alpestris?).  If it would bloom, hint, hint, I could ID it, and pay it a little attention. 

It could eventually form a large colony for which there just isn't room.  If someone were to fall on it, that fall would be fatal.  The leaves and spines are as sharp as a brand new knife.  It would be nice if it bloomed before I remove it, which I will if it doesn't bloom soon.  I will have to remove it anyway.  The satisfaction-to-space-taken ratio is not good.  

In an inaccessible location, appropriate for its razor-sharp foliage:
Can the Puya be shamed?  After only a few months in the garden, on little water, the Eremophila 'Grey Horizons' has flowered a golden flower. 
The first flower from Protea neriifolia, planted fall 2016.  The flower is a little deformed because the plant is young and not yet established.  But its making the effort.   I like the black fringe. 
Blooming at a small size, far smaller than the Puya.
This little iceplant (Delosperma 'Cherry Bomb', maybe) was lost under another plant and assumed gone, but I found a tiny scrap of it, which has survived.  The plant is now over 6" wide.  Despite it's near-demise, it still manages to bloom,  Puya!
Status check on the white Aloe ferox.  It's managed to bloom this year, even though its location is just as dry as the Puya.
Grevillea 'Superb' -- the amount of flowers on this plant is insane.
Gorgeous winter flower from 'Yves Piaget'. 
The fragrance is so good even Iron Piggy, who lives on the dining room table, can enjoy a whiff.  
Mmmmmm!
 You ashamed, Puya?  Its been more than a decade.  Gimme a flower!  Or else!

Comments

  1. Aren't Puyas monocarpic? Maybe it's just taking its time, like an Agave. Also, this may sound like a strange suggestion, but have you ever fertilized it? They're (supposedly) proto-carnivorous, which means they trap small animals and feed off the decomposition, so maybe it wants some feeding. Keep the doggies away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, monocarpic, but there are several rosettes, so no excuse. Sacrificial squirrels might make them bloom--I'd be willing to sacrifice a few to find out.

      Not to worry, not accessible to doggies!

      Delete
  2. Hope this works! I did something similar when waiting for the first flower from my Magnolia macrophylla...and it worked!

    Grevillea 'Superb'...oh my!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe set the shovel next to it?

      'Superb' was correctly named!

      Delete
  3. My experience is that direct, spoken threats are more effective than shaming. The underperforming ones just shrug off the unflattering comparisons with, "So? They're not me."

    White-flowering anything rings my bell, and that Aloe ferox is mighty handsome. I'm assuming the florets get paler as they mature and open fully? If so, the spires should really jump out from their surroundings soon; more shame for the nearby sulking Puya to shrug off...

    And more food for hummingbirds, spoiled for choice at your place now. Best wishes for getting all your fall haul in the ground! Those rains are surely coming.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm eyeing that Puya's space because--I need the space.

      No idea how the ferox develops. I'm watching. The red ones get redder. Will the white one get whiter? No idea.

      The rain is falling, the plants are waiting still.

      Delete
  4. Iron Piggy and Yves win this week's In a Vase on Monday; too funny. The image makes the viewer yearn to sniff the rose.

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  5. Your 'Superb' is indeed superb! I hope the Puya comes through for you. I have one, still small even though it's been in the ground at least 3 years. It's been swamped by an Agave desmettiana next to it and I keep forgetting to try moving it - but maybe the Agave will bloom and I won't have to! I have that same Protea but mine is in a pot and, as the foliage is a yellowish-orange, I expect it's stressed and needs to be moved pronto.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read that Protea is found in areas that flood, so it can take water. The desmettiana will bloom soon enough. The Puya will continue.

      Delete
  6. With tight-fitted pink satin and black fringe, the flower on the young Protea neriifolia evokes a saloon dancer in the old west. Wild.

    'Straya must be a marvel in places. I mean, look at that Grevillea 'Superb'! Have you ever visited there?

    ReplyDelete
  7. "Puya shaming," one of the titles ever!! I bet it'll bloom this year. I threatened our Bearss lime tree after five years of doing nothing, and it promptly produced a crop that year!

    Great to see your Eremophila 'Grey Horizons' in bloom. I checked my two and no signs of flowers yet. But based on your photo, I have a lot to look forward to.

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    Replies
    1. Well, no sign of a flower stalk as yet.

      The Eremophila has been growing and looks better and better. Yay!

      Delete
  8. Oh Puya! Why can't you be more like your sisters? They're already giving me grandchildren! If you don't bloom soon, I'll throw dead squirrels at you. Yes, shaming and threats always produce the best results with plants. Love your rose-sniffing pig.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You would think threatening them with squirrels would work. I'll try it, thanks!

      Delete
  9. My Puya chilensis is about 8 years old now, and tho Annie's says blooms after 10-15 years there are accounts of it blooming younger, so hope springs eternal. I don't shame it but keep a respectful distance -- scariest plant in the garden! With proteas, grevilleas, and Yves P., that puya can take its sweet time.

    ReplyDelete

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