Animal Shelter Landscape

 Our county has a new Animal Shelter.  We stopped by to visit.  The landscape was interesting.  They went low water/native, mostly.
In the parking lot, Salvia greggii,  Leucophyllum,  Leymus condensatus 'Canyon Prince'.  Washingtonia palms and Podocarpus trees (maybe). 
 Multiple swales to keep rainwater on site so it sinks into the ground instead of running   This is a new thing to keep pollution and as a side effect, trash, out of the ocean.  Because water carries trash.  The swale is filled with California golden poppy at the moment.  No rain water this year. 
Between kennel buildings,  a few trees and some shrubs, including an Agonis tree,  prostrate rosemary, Callistemon 'Little John', and more Salvia greggi.

 More Leymus condensatus 'Canyon Prince' grass,  plus Lavatera maratima, Handroanthus impetiginosus, formerly Tabebuia impetiginosa.
 Another swale basin to collect rainwater.  Unfortunately we got very little rain this winter. 
They were having an adoption fair and there were a lot of families there. 

Spaces for meeting new friends with artificial turf to keep things clean
 Some nice dogs that deserve good homes.
 These little guys looked like siblings
Room for expansion and plants in the meantime
Back at home,  this is Boris with the "throw the ball" look on his face.  
Throw.  The.  Ball.  Now.  
May all good dogs have good homes.  And a ball. 

Comments

  1. Indeed! And nice move to go low water type of planting.

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    1. Be interesting to see how it grows and if it gets decent maintenance. (Trying not to picture clump grasses sheared into tidy cubes.)

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  2. They have made this place quite beautiful. I hope all the doggies get good homes too.

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  3. I'm impressed to see public facilities like this giving thought to the plants they use and rainwater retention. We're getting spit at by Mother Nature this morning, although no measurable rain accumulation as yet. Rain in May! Who'd have thought that could happen?! I hope you get a bit too.

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    Replies
    1. I'm seeing a lot of commercial building lawns being converted to Aloe striata and the like. The key is maintenance--anyone can water and mow a lawn more or less competently. Shrubs and such, a different story.

      No, we got nary a drop from the sky, but at least it's nice and cool.

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