Unexpected Color Combination Vingettes

 The Hummannia plant with its chrome yellow flowers grew where it felt like growing;  when the 'Catherine Woodbery' daylily, with its chrome-yellow centers began to flower, together they created an unexpectedly good pairing.

The lavender-pink Pentas and lavender-blue Geranium 'Rozanne' create a summer berries combo delicious enough to want to eat.  Never occurred to me to put them together until I stopped with the little potted Pentas in my hand to give 'Rozanne' some water, and realized there was a space adjacent to 'Rozanne' that needed filling.
 I planted a little Felicia next to Lagerstroemia 'Ebony Fire' because there was room.  The Felicia was not yet blooming.  When it did, the black and blue was dramatic.  Unintentional, and again, unexpected. 
The mass of rusty-bronzy Aeonium nobile flowers at the base of Acer 'Emperor I', and adjacent to Aeonium 'Zwartzkop' was another unexpected delight.  Pre-flowering, Aeonium nobile was a dull green--I didn't know what color the flowers would be, or that the foliage would color as well.  
Plants will surprise you--sometimes in a good way.

Thank goodness the plants work out amazing color pairings on their own--I could never think of these things myself.   

More vignettes of all sorts today at Flutter and Hum.

Comments

  1. Bright yellow is hard to mute but somehow got softened by the lavender/old rose shade in that daylily, lovely!

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    1. Now why would I want to mute bright yellow? ;^)

      Seriously, it takes intense colors to hold up to our intense and constant sunlight. What is gaudy elsewhere avoids being all bleached out here (most of the time, anyway).

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  2. Love all of these! The echo of the daylily throats with the Hunnemannia blooms is particularly riveting because they're so similar in size and shape as well as color.
    The Aeonium reminds that it's only just now sinking in with me how much succulents can change color in response to changes in water and heat. Recent pics at the Danger Garden (deep purple and bright red prickly pears from Loree's desert trip) and A Growing Obsession (Aloes and others at different seasons) show what a design opportunity that presents. With the drawback that the timing for strongest effect is pretty much out of the gardener's hands...

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    Replies
    1. Well, after a few years it's pretty predictable, if the gardener is attentive. Drought and either heat or a bit of chill--or all three.

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  3. That daylily shot is so cheerful! The black and blue is pretty fabulous too.

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  4. These are wonderful! The Pentas-Geranium match is one I'd have never anticipated either but it's perfect.

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    Replies
    1. I think it is a blue-purple and a pinky-purple. Or something like that.

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  5. Perfect! I love black foliage.. it creates dramatic effects with so many things. But with that electric blue, wow!

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    1. It is wow, the picture does not do it justice (must try again). I just wish I was clever enough to think of it myself.

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  6. Lovely color combos! They're even better when you're not expecting them, I think.

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    1. Yes, and a sense of relief follows as well--I don't have to move anything.

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  7. The black and blue combination reminds me of black and blue salvia, one of my favorite flowers. These are all beautiful combinations of serendipity.

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