Wednesday Vignette: Work Together

When we walk out towards the street from the garage, this Lavender meets the eye.  It is especially fine backlit in early morning light.  Appearing as a volunteer seedling in that very spot, I could not have placed it to better effect.  My contribution has been several light shears, to make the Lavender's form more compact and symmetrical, without making it look unnatural.  We worked together for a good result. 

Also working together for a good result are Boris and Natasha, looking on with adoring eyes as The Man Who Eats Meat carries a tray of freshly barbecued chicken.  Just two innocent bumps of arms from two loving noses could create a good result:  chicken dinner!
 More vignettes at Flutter and Hum.  Join in the fun!

Comments

  1. Aww, those dogs get me every time... so adorable! And, you and the Lavender have done a beautiful job with your combined efforts. That really is a magical placement!

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    1. They use their adorability to their advantage. If I was that adorable, I would, too.

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  2. There's a reason 'Man' is their best friend!

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    1. Well, tummy rubs must count for something, because they like vegetarians, too.

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  3. But they look so sweet and innocent! As to the lavender, I let mine stay where it self-seeds too, although I can't say mine has done quite as good a job in setting its landing.

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  4. Self-sowing lavender! {Laughs weakly.}. I won't bother to disguise my envy.
    What kind is that backlit beauty? The spikes look fat like Spanish lavender (L. stoechas) but the "rabbit ears" florets on top aren't quite as tall as I'd expect.

    Your adorable pair of plotters are fully entranced by that chicken. To the point that any bumping of elbows would simply be the universe expressing itself, nothing so crass as a calculated maneuver.

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    1. Some of them look more stoechas, others more dentata, some look Goodwin Creek Greyish. If they have a strong lavender fragrance, I'm happy. Such a wonderful scent!

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    2. Isn't it? It's the garden equivalent of ginger in the kitchen -- restorative, energizing. Worth the trouble of creating free-draining spots in the orange clay, and planting anew every few years.

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  5. All of the plants in that corner look good. I love the smell of laveder. Here you have it seeding around and I can't keep it alive. I need to find a dry sunny space no doubt. Seeing the sun also makes me feel warmer. Seeing Boris and Natasha with such sweet expectant eyes...a truly aww moment.

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    1. It likes dry heat, that is for sure. SoCal is perfect for it. Yes you have the polar vortex, hope you are staying warm! I wonder if your garden will be okay after such extreme cold, though right now everybody's safety is more pressing.

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  6. Perhaps I need to clear my oldest inherited lavender. The seedlings are easier to coax into a smart casual shape.

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    1. Most lavenders are good for around 5-7 years here, then they get too woody. How long do they last for you?

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