Some Then And Nows September 2019

2010:
 This morning.  Sure don't miss that lawn, the $%#&*@! Cercis trees, or the view of the neighbor's roof.   The path to the gate is still there.  Have you ever noticed that non-plant people will see something like this and say "How do you get through there?" while plant people will be carefully walking the path, looking at the plants. 
Summer 2014.  The first real bloom of the 'Dynamite' Crepe Myrtles.  I was so happy to be rid of the Cercis trees.  I still let everything get a little overgrown, though not as bad.  Getting better. 
 This morning.  Still happy with the 'Dynamite's.  That oak sure has grown.  It was about a foot tall in 2014.  A few less roses, a little more variety in plant selection.  The early morning shade cast by the oak is most welcome.  The area is still blasted by sun for six or seven hours a day. 
 Way back in 2005, when we were so proud of how huge the Acer palmatum had gotten.  The dreadful Wisteria was sthere being a pest, way over on the right edge of the photo.  Dug out in 2006.  That same Hydrangea, rose 'Belindas Dream', and the begonia at lower right are still there today.   I don't think I've given the begonia any fertilizer since 2005.  Should do that.  The Azalea at the base of the Acer is long gone, as is the aggressive Campanula.  It took ten years to get rid of the Campanula, and Wisteria.  I pull all the Parthenocissus off the wall about every three years now, so it doesn't get so thick.   The Cypress and Pittosporum were yet to be planted in 2005.   Hah!  There's even a foxglove there, on the far left.  Haven't grown a foxglove since. The purple, Salvia 'East Friesland', is still in the garden, same plant, but divided and moved around here and there.  Talk about value for the money...
Fourteen years later, yesterday afternoon.  Not the best lighting.
 Back in April when the Maple was half leafed out, with its spring-red foliage:

 Gardens change, as do gardeners. Is it good to look back?  Does the past have any meaning in the present? 

Comments

  1. The sign of a good design is it ages well. Your fourteen year transformation is doing just that. What a big difference from start to now. Looks gorgeous!

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    1. Thanks, it has been an education for me. Also a gym!

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  2. Your garden was always beautiful but it's much more "you" now. I enjoy looking back. It reminds me how far the garden has come - and occasionally has me wondering "now where did that plant go?" I wish I was able to get the second of the 2 Wisteria I inherited out - the damn thing's roots extend under the house I think.

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    1. Thanks. Your garden has come such a long way so quickly! The root system on my Wisteria went everywhere, under concrete, even under the pond.

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  3. I love looking back-it gives me a sense of accomplishment , and a history of how my plant choices have evolved. I have enjoyed your thoughtful approach through the years.

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  4. I think it is great fun to look back at how the garden evolves. It shows how not only the garden changes but how the Gardener's interests change over the years. Through out this evolution your garden looks fabulous. FUN...

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    1. Thanks Lisa. Interests have evolved, skills have developed (a little) but I still love roses!

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  5. Tweaking and adjusting over the years has brought steady improvement, and I love the more relaxed feel you're getting.

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  6. Beautiful! Definitely good to look back, some times I long for an old combination or view, but all in all I love the slow progression forward. The lawn in the first photo just looks so out of place!

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    1. Yes, I love lush green lawns, but they don't belong here.

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