Further Adventures With Fred

 The mass of Graptoveria 'Fred Ives' by the gate needed to be cleaned out and replanted.   The mass started out as a single sunburnt rosette back in 2014.  
It was so happy to get out of a pot and into the ground, that it quickly became many rosettes:
It has grown and thrived these three years with morning sun, afternoon shade, and light but regular irrigation.  I've rooted rosettes from the original clump and planted them in many different places in the garden.  

One of the other clumps in all-day sun and reflected heat:  'Fred Ives' can do fairly well if regularly watered.  The foliage color is much different than in shade or part sun.
I have a long history with 'Fred Ives'.  A little white-haired elderly neighbor gave me a rosette when I was five years old.  I had it for quite a time and was fascinated by it, but I don't remember what happened to it.  Planted in Mom & Dad's garden, and lost at some point, probably.  I've blogged about this plant before, but it continues to intrigue me.  A clump produces masses of flowers which the hummingbirds will visit constantly. 

The clean up yielded more additional rosettes than I expected.  Many more. 
Two crested plants, too.
One, large.
 After a lot of rosette removal...
 I noticed that new rosettes were plentiful where I'd done some cutting back a few months ago (rosettes were getting in the way of opening the gate):
 There were also a mass of larger rosettes where I'd done some cutting back last year:
The old stuff may not need to be removed.  Shortened stems sprout new rosettes easily.  I shortened all the bare stems, tossing the extra lengths into the green waste bin.  But there are all these extra rosettes, too.  A whole lot of them. 
 Now what? 

Comments

  1. I adore Fred and am slightly jealous of your success!

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    1. More success than I expected. Lots more.

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  2. Use them as bows on your Christmas gifts, and give them away! Or make a Fred Ives wreath... I wish they would survive up here - it's a wonderful succulent!

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    1. 'Fred Ives' wreath sounds beautiful. I'll look into that. :)

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  3. I admire your success with Fred! I can't say any of mine have proved that vigorous. Maybe I need to start hacking mine back (although it's questionable that there's enough to hack). I like Anna's ideas for dealing with your bounty.

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    1. I've found that the more sun 'Fred's get the more water they need. The ones that are very dry in full sun are not happy. Very dry in full shade, or regular water in full sun, they are doing quite well.

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  4. OOOH, OOH! I would love a Fred Ives! :) I think a wreath would be a nice use for them too. Succulents are so fun. I love your story of how you've had Fred Ives since childhood. I've had that with 'Hens & Chicks' too. I can't remember know how my neighbor grew them back east, maybe she brought them inside during the brutal winters. I have some now and they always make me think of her.

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    1. You are welcome to have some if you like Mishy. :)

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  5. I'm tempted to send you a self-addressed, postage-paid box. Sadly, it really is the wrong time of year for Fred here.

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    1. LMK in the spring if you want some. There will likely be more than there are now!

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  6. Beautiful! You could make many new plants with all those cuttings! Here I can't make a succulent bed, I've tried but when it rains for weeks the plants get soft and die. I keep my succulents in pots and move them under the roof when things get too wet.

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    1. Your humid climate makes them more challenging to grow than here where it is more arid. I have some in pots under the roof, and they are too dry!

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  7. Very impressive! Fred does appear to perform entirely different in shade than in sun, which I guess is to be expected. Looks like you have some good plans for most of those new cuttings. Good luck! :)

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    1. Thanks! 'Fred' rosettes seem happier with a little shade--much slower in full sun and a tendency to bleach, but the difference in color range of the foliage depending on location makes 'Fred' all the better.

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  8. Fred would be magnificent as a wreath.

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    1. Yes he would. Considering how many rosettes are waiting, I may get the opportunity to prove that. :)

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  9. I love your last photo. A perfect illustration of how prolific echeverias are. I'd be happy to take a few cuttings off your hands :-).

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